radical

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radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]
References in periodicals archive ?
The world leaders and experts, even the army generals, concede that there is no military solution to radicalism and terrorism.
Without implying direct causality between unemployment and radicalism, it is nevertheless useful to remember that unemployment with some level of education was a common denominator for the majority of high-profile terrorists involved in what came to be called jihadist terrorism.
This focus results from McLaughlin's general method in this chapter, which is to use a single work of a particular author to analyse the particular political radicalism he or she espouses (in Bakunin's case, God and the State is the chosen text).
This book, a collection of essays drawn from the proceedings of a 2006 academic conference on early modern English radicalism held at Goldsmiths, University of London, develops this revisionist view more fully by reviewing examples of English radical thought from the mid-seventeenth century to the early nineteenth century.
"There were steps and fatwas from clerics like Mr Qaradawi, these fatwas escalate and encourage apostasy and radicalism in the region," Hossein Amir Abdollahian, Iranian Deputy Minister for Arab and Foreign Affairs, told reporters in Kuwait.
It is a fact that some writers, politicians and journalists - long known for their "anti-Islamic" views, but who are really criticising radicalism - have themselves been behaving radically.
which goes well beyond merely presenting alternative intellectual viewpoints on radicalism to advocating ideas, beliefs and actions that are contrary to our national policy, inconsistent with the values of our profession and disrespectful of the Islamic religion," Dempsey said in a memo.
Mufti Chubak ajy Jalilov will participate in international theological conference "Islamic doctrine against radicalism", reported Muslim Spiritual Directorate of Kyrgyzstan.
The Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860-1914.
Although the conference did address different forms/ motivations of terrorism, the central focus was on Islamic radicalism and terrorism alike.
" A newly released study calls on US policymakers to deepen their understanding of homegrown radicalism and its sources and to devise a comprehensive counter-radicalisation strategy.
It offers new information on episodes such as Brainerd's famous expulsion from Yale, which may have been precipitated by more persistent, abrasive radicalism than Brainerd simply declaring that tutor Chauncey Whittelsey had no more grace than a chair.