radiation myelopathy

ra·di·a·tion my·e·lop·a·thy

damage to a portion of the spinal cord from exposure to x-rays or other high-energy radiation; most often affects the cervical segments; depending on their time of onset and persistence, two forms are recognized: the early type which appears within 6 months following irradiation and may be transient, and the late, delayed type, which appears more than 6 months after radiation and is typically chronic and progressive.
Synonym(s): radiation myelitis

ra·di·a·tion my·e·lop·a·thy

(rādē-āshŭn mīĕ-lopă-thē)
Spinal cord damage from exposure to x-rays or other high-energy radiation; most often affects the cervical segments.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Laperriere, "Radiation myelopathy following single courses of radiotherapy and retreatment," International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics, vol.
Radiation myelopathy (RM) is an irreversible impairment of the brain and spinal cord that has received much attention in the last years [16, 17].
Radiotherapy to the brain can lead to the rise of radiation myelopathy both by focused or whole-brain irradiation techniques.
Liew, "Radiation myelopathy following transplantation and radiotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma," International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, vol.
When a second course of EBRT is given using conventional techniques, one must weigh the clinical benefits against the risks of radiation myelopathy, although there remains a relative lack of understanding of reirradiation spinal cord tolerance in the literature [9-13].
Ma et al., "Probabilities of radiation myelopathy specific to stereotactic body radiation therapy to guide safe practice," International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, vol.
Eshraghyan, "Evaluation of melatonin for prevention of radiation myelopathy in irradiated cervical spinal cord," Cell Journal, vol.
(2) Opponents of RT argue that reoperation becomes very difficult after therapy, and that radiation myelopathy could worsen neurological deficits.3 The 5-year survival rate is approximately 82%.

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