radial tuberosity


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Related to radial tuberosity: Bicipital aponeurosis

ra·di·al tu·ber·os·i·ty

[TA]
an oval projection from the medial surface of the radius just distal to the neck, giving attachment (insertion) on its posterior half to the tendon of the biceps.

radial tuberosity

a large blunt projection on the medial surface of the radius for the attachment of the biceps brachii tendon.

ra·di·al tu·ber·os·i·ty

(rā'dē-ăl tū'bĕr-os'i-tē) [TA]
An oval projection from the medial surface of the radius just distal to the neck, giving attachment (insertion) on its posterior half to the tendon of the biceps.

tuberosity

an elevation or protuberance.

deltoid tuberosity
a prominence on the lateral aspect of the humerus; the point of attachment of the deltoid muscle.
facial tuberosity
a discrete elevation on the maxilla of cows which serves as an attachment for the rostral part of the masseter muscle.
ischial tuberosity
the pin bone; the most caudal process of the ischium.
olecranon tuberosity
the free end of the ulna; point of attachment of the triceps brachii muscle.
radial tuberosity
a rough patch on the cranial aspect of the proximal end of the radius.
tibial tuberosity
prominent tuberosity protruding from the cranial aspect of the proximal end of the tibia onto which the patellar ligament inserts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The footprint of the distal biceps insertion is located on the posteroulnar aspect of the radial tuberosity and occupies approximately one-third of the total area of the tuberosity.
In terms of imaging, radiographs are usually obtained to rule out any associated elbow injuries, and may occasionally show irregularity about the radial tuberosity or avulsion fractures.
47) In the original description, suture was passed through a bone trough created in the radial tuberosity, and the tendon was passed through the tunnel which involved sub-periosteal stripping of the ulna.
It is hypothesized that since the distal biceps inserts onto the posterior ulnar aspect of the radial tuberosity, repair using a one-incision technique would attach the tendon in a more anterior position and may result in loss of supination torque.
A non-anatomic attachment of the distal biceps to the brachialis muscle, as opposed to an anatomic attachment to the radial tuberosity, may result in as high as a 50% loss of supination strength.
Early anatomic repairs utilized a single anterior incision via the Henry approach to reattach the distal biceps to the radial tuberosity through drill holes.
Should surgical intervention be necessary, most investigators advocate conversion of the partial tear into a complete tear, followed by reinsertion onto the radial tuberosity.