radial nerve


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ra·di·al nerve

[TA]
arises from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus conveying fibers from all roots of the plexus; it curves around the posterior surface of the humerus and passes down to the cubital fossa where it divides into its two terminal branches, the cutaneous superficial and the motor deep; it supplies the muscles of the posterior compartments of the arm and forearm and overlying skin. The radial nerve is most commonly injured by fractures of the middle third of the humerus, resulting in a loss of extension at the wrist ("wrist drop").

ra·di·al nerve

(rā'dē-ăl nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus; it curves around the posterior surface of the humerus and passes down to the cubital fossa, where it divides into its two terminal branches, the superficial and deep; it supplies muscular and cutaneous branches to the posterior compartments of the arm and forearm. The radial nerve is most commonly injured by fractures of the middle third of the humerus, resulting in a loss of extension at the wrist ("wrist drop").
Synonym(s): nervus radialis [TA] .

radial nerve

One of the main nerves of the arm and hand. The radial nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. It supplies the forearm muscles that straighten the flexed wrist and conveys sensation from the back of the forearm and hand.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radial nerve injuries; presenting as wrist drop-analysis of 100 patients.
When the recipient nerve was the radial nerve, the muscle strength recovery efficiency rate after CC7 nerve transfer was 0.50 (95% CI : 0.31-0.70).{Table 3}
Upon examining the sensory and motor block characteristics of all the nerves at the 20th minute (Table 2), statistically significant differences were found only in the sensory and motor block characteristics of radial nerve (p<0.05).
The bifurcation point of the sensory (superficial radial) and motor (PIN) branches of the radial nerve occurred on average 10.3 mm proximal to the lateral epicondyle.
Humerus fractures constitute about 3 to 5% of all fractures of which majority can be managed by traditional care but some of them will need surgery.1 Open reduction and internal fixation with plating is generally accepted as the best method of treatment for displaced diaphyseal fractures of the humerus in the adult, with advantages of stable fixation, direct visualization, protection of the radial nerve, and sparing of the adjacent shoulder and elbow joint from injury.1 Fixation techniques based on compression principles have a lower incidence of non-union and are found to accelerate healing, with less joint stiffness.
The subcutaneous tissue was dissected, taking care of preserving the branches of the superficial radial nerve. The abductor pollicis longus (APL) and the extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) are identified and protected (Figure 3).
It is common clinical practice to elicit symptoms with the neck in neutral, then to utilise neck lateral flexion as a sensitising manoeuvre to aid in structural differentiation, especially when suspecting more distal pathology such as carpal tunnel syndrome or radial nerve entrapment (Butler 2000).
Cumulative traumatic disorders that dental practitioners face are carpel tunnel syndrome, ulnar or radial nerve entrapment, pronator syndrome, tendinitis, extensor wad strain, and thoracic outlet syndrome.
Among the 202 operated patients, 97(48%) had median nerve damage, in 91(45%) the ulnar nerve was injured and 14(7%) had radial nerve injury.
(9) Two trials studying the effect of radial nerve mobilization on patients with thumb CMC OA found it to have hypoalgesic effects on the same (10) and contralateral hand, (11) indicating bilateral hypoalgesic effects of the practice.