radial head

radial head

the most proximal aspect of the radius bone. This area is mobile within the anular ligament and allows pronation and supination of the forearm.
See also: elbow.

ra·di·al head

(rā'dē-ăl hed)
The most proximal aspect of the radius bone. This area is mobile within the anular ligament and allows pronation and supination of the forearm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Follow-up radiographs showed <30[degrees] angulation and 1 mm of translation of the radial head (Figure 1(b)).
The radial head fracture is the most common elbow fracture in adults.
Children with nondisplaced radial head or radial neck fractures can be treated with a posterior splint and ice.
More recent case series have included floating elbow variants including ipsilateral diaphyseal humeral fracture with proximal ulna fracture, and proximal radioulnar joint disruption (Monteggia fracture); ipsilateral diaphyseal humeral fracture, elbow dislocation, and diaphyseal ulna and radius fracture; and distal humerus fractures with intraarticular fractures of the olecranon or radial head [5,7].
In a literature search of "elbow locking," there was only a single case report of unrecognized osteochondral radial head fracture reported as an unusual cause of locking.
The radial head attaches firmly to the entire medial border and caudal aspect of the radius, enveloped by a tough septum of the antebrachial fascia.
Computed tomography (CT) reveals a normal radial head (Figure 3).
To our knowledge, only one study has been addressed using radial head prosthesis in conjunction with the osteocutaneous fibular flap to restore elbow stability and range of motion [5].
Morrey, "Current concepts in the treatment of fractures of the radial head, the olecranon, and the coronoid," The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, vol.
Combined radial head fractures and interosseous ligament ruptures often result in severe disability, causing proximal migration of the radius, chronic wrist pain, reduced grip strength, and loss of range of motion.