microwave radar

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microwave radar

Sublethal exposure has been associated with headaches, insomnia, irritability, photophobia, and diastolic HTN; after acute exposure, there is a sensation of warmth, and ↑ CK
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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While Europe's automotive industry continues to encourage deployment of automotive radar through increasing efforts in popularizing automated driving technology, it is unsurprising that Europe will continue to represent an important automotive radar market in the near future.
Some of the major factors influencing the expansion of the global radar sensors market in the automotive sector are increased awareness for passenger and vehicle safety, inclination towards automated vehicles, improving road safety regulations, the inclusion of advanced technological features in all types of automobiles and others.
In a relevant development in March, the Iranian Army's Khatam ol-Anbiya Air Defense Base unveiled two new indigenized state-of-the-art radar systems.
When combined with Radar Live, it ensures an organization can safely deploy innovative insights from machine learning models to market in minutes, the company continued.
It's important to remember ATC radar coverage is slightly different than weather radar, but has similar limitations.
The KF-X radar development project started in August 2016, and DAPA has since conducted preliminary design review for the development of the radar's hardware and software.
The new rack-mount unit comprises two Cambridge Pixel HPx-346 radar-to-network cards featuring a combined ARM/FPGA system-on-chip processor to handle the radar acquisition and data conversion.
RADAR Construction Software is cloud-based construction application that provides intuitive, collaborative tools to manage multiple construction projects from any location.
The next longer wavelengths are C-band (6,000 MHz, 5 cm), which were historically used for "storm warning radars" and are now used by TDWR (Terminal Doppler Weather Radar) and TV station radars.