racemose


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Related to racemose: racemose gland

racemose

 [ra´sĕ-mōs]
shaped like a bunch of grapes on its stalk.

rac·e·mose

(ras'ĕ-mōs), Avoid the mispronunciation rās'mōs.
Branching, with nodular terminations; resembling a bunch of grapes.
[L. racemosus, full of clusters]

racemose

/rac·e·mose/ (ras´ĭ-mōs) shaped like grapes on their stem.

racemose

(răs′ə-mōs′)
adj.
1. Botany Resembling or borne in a raceme.
2. Anatomy Having a structure of clustered parts. Used of glands.

rac′e·mose′ly adv.

racemose

[ras′əmōs′]
Etymology: L, racemus
like a bunch of grapes. The term is used in describing a structure in which many branches terminate in nodular cystlike forms such as pulmonary alveoli.

rac·e·mose

(ras'ĕ-mōs)
Branching, with nodular terminations; resembling a bunch of grapes.
[L. racemosus, full of clusters]

racemose

Having a structure of clustered parts, especially of a gland. From the Latin racemosus , clustered, as in racemus , a bunch of grapes.

racemose

being or resembling a RACEME.

racemose

shaped like a bunch of grapes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The racemose form of neurocysticercosis consists of a single large vesicle or mass of vesicles that often resembles a cluster of grapes and may measure up to 10 cm.
In these cases, the FU consists of a complex branching system with a main axis and branches; it is a paniculiform inflorescence with spiciform or racemose branches, depicted as a branched spike (Townsend, 1993), a panicle (Standley, 1917; Eliasson, 1987; Robertson, 1981), a paniculiform complex inflorescence (Borsch, 2001) or a synflorescence of racemes (Sanchez-del Pino & Flores Olivera, 2006).
Cases of racemose cysticercosis, a phenomenon in which cysticerci continue to grow and spread through tissue, may also have a poor prognosis (16).
The only species known, have alternate leaves, simple racemose inflorescences and samaroid fruits.
of the primary shBrs determines a raceme of spikelets or a spike of spikelets depending on whether the internode has developed or not, respectively (Camara Hernandez & Rua, 1992; Vegetti & Anton, 2000); (3) different types of panicles: (a) with spicate or racemose branches (Vegetti & Anton, 2000); (b) with alternate, subopposite or pseudoverticillate branches (Vegetti & Anton, 2000; Reinheimer & Vegetti, 2008); (c) with branches along an axis with conspicuous intenodes, or with these internodes and two distal ones conjugated or with only two conjugated primary branches (Paspalum, Rua & Weberling, 1998; Souza-Chies et al.
In some cases, Sparganum proliferum is favored, while in others racemose cysticercus or undifferentiated sparganum or tetrathyridium is thought to represent the aberrant cestode larva.
Capitulescences monocephalous or few at the end of the branches, or laxly to densely corymbose, racemose to paniculate, rarely glomerulose or pseudocephalia.
Capitulescences unilaterally spicate, racemose to paniculate; capitula sessile to pedunculate, homogamous, ligulate, one- to five-flowered; receptacle epaleate; involucre multiseriate.
Capitulescences monocephalous, laxly to densely corymbose, racemose, paniculate to glomemlose or pseudocephalia.
Capitulescences monocephalous, racemose, spicate, to glomerulose or pseudocephalium; capitula sessile to pedunculate, homogamous, discoid or radiate, five-flowered, occasionally one- to four-flowered; receptacle epaleate; involucre two-seriate.