quinine


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Related to quinine: quinine water, quinine sulfate

quinine

 [kwi´nīn]
an alkaloid of cinchona that is an antimalarial agent; it suppresses the asexual erythrocytic forms of malarial parasites and has a slight effect on the gametocytes. It also has analgesic, antipyretic, mild oxytocic, cardiac depressant, and sclerosing properties, and it decreases the excitability of the motor endplate. It is administered orally as the dihydrochloride, hydrochloride or sulfate salt or parenterally as the dihydrochloride salt in the treatment of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. It is also used orally as the sulfate salt in the treatment of leg and foot cramps.

qui·nine

(kwī'nīn, -nēn, kwin'-īn, -ēn),
The most important of the alkaloids derived from cinchona; an antimalarial effective against the asexual and erythrocytic forms of the parasite, but having no effect on the exoerythrocytic (tissue) forms. It does not produce a radical cure of malaria produced by Plasmodium vivax, P. malariae, or P. ovale, but is used in the treatment of chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum.

quinine

/qui·nine/ (kwi´nīn) (kwin-ēn´) (kwin´in) an alkaloid of cinchona that was once widely used to control and prevent malaria; it also has analgesic, antipyretic, mild oxytocic, cardiac depressant, and sclerosing properties, and it decreases the excitability of the motor end plate. It is used as the dihydrochloride, hydrochloride, or sulfate salt in the treatment of resistant falciparum malaria.

quinine

(kwī′nīn′)
n.
A bitter alkaloid, C20H24N2O2, derived from the bark of several species of cinchona, used usually in the form of its sulfate salt to treat malaria and formerly to treat leg cramps. It is used in the form of its hydrochloride or sulfate salt as a flavoring, especially in tonic water.

quinine

[kwī′nīn]
Etymology: Sp, quina, bark
a white, bitter, crystalline alkaloid made from cinchona bark. It was formerly used in antimalarial medications and replaced when chloroquine became available. It is once again being used to treat some cases of chloroquine-resistant malaria. See also antimalarial.

qui·nine

(kwī'nīn, kwin'ēn)
The most important of the alkaloids derived from cinchona; an antimalarial agent effective against the asexual and erythrocytic forms of the parasite but having no effect on the exoerythrocytic (tissue) forms; does not effect a radical cure of malaria produced by Plasmodium vivax, P. malariae, or P. ovale, but is used in the treatment of cerebral malaria and other severe attacks of malignant tertian malaria and in malaria produced by chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum; also used as an antipyretic, analgesic, sclerosing agent, stomachic, and oxytocic (occasionally), and in the treatment of atrial fibrillation, myotonia congenita, and other myopathies.

quinine

The first drug found to be effective in the prevention and treatment of MALARIA. Quinine was originally derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is still used to treat CHLOROQUINE-resistant malaria but is no longer used as a PROPHYLACTIC. The drug is on the WHO official list.

quinine

an antimalarial DRUG, extracted from the bark of the Cinchona tree. It is an ALKALOID and is effective against SPOROZOITES in the RED BLOOD CELLS.

Quinine

One of the first treatments for malaria, quinine is a natural product made from the bark of the Cinchona tree. It was popular until being superseded by the development of chloroquine in the 1940s. In the wake of widespread chloroquine resistance, however, it has become popular again. Quinine, or its close relative quinidine, can be given intravenously to treat severe Falciparum malaria.
Mentioned in: Malaria

quinine

cinchona derivative (antimalarial agent) with antipyretic and analgesic actions; used to treat muscle cramps (e.g. reduces night cramps in 25% of cases), myopathies and atrial fibrillation

quinine,

n Latin name:
Cinchona succirubra; part used: bark; uses: malaria, nighttime leg cramps; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, severe gastrointestinal illness, neurological disorders, severe liver disease, psoriasis, tinnitus, cardiotoxic, kidney damage, aluminum salts, anticoagulants, cardiac glycosides, neuromuscular blocking medications, sodium bicarbonate. Also called
cinchona, Jesuit's bark, or
Peruvian bark.

qui·nine

(kwī'nīn, kwin'ēn)
An agent effective against the asexual and erythrocytic forms of malaria but with no effect on the exoerythrocytic (tissue) forms; does not effect a radical cure of malaria, but is used to treat cerebral malaria and other severe outbreaks of malignant tertian malaria and in malaria produced by chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum.

quinine (kwī´nīn),

n an alkaloid derived from cinchona that is effec-tive against malaria. It is also used as an antipyretic, analgesic, sclerosing agent, and stomachic and in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and myotonia congenita.

quinine

an alkaloid from Cinchona spp. plants of South America used in some forms of malaria in humans. Quinine also has analgesic, antipyretic, mild oxytocic, cardiac depressant, and sclerosing properties, and it decreases the excitability of the motor end-plate. It may be the cause of an immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

quinine tree
see alstoniaconstricta.
References in periodicals archive ?
5%) into 96-well plates predosed with antimalarial drugs (monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin, artesunate, piperaquine, pyronaridine, and doxycycline).
For many decades, Quinine remained the mainstay of treatment for nocturnal leg cramps [5-7], and various trials were done to prove its benefit [8-10].
Artesunate versus Quinine in the treatment of severe falciparum malaria in African children(AQUAMAT): an open-label randomized trial.
In contrast to treatment with quinine, which does result in immediate destruction of infected erythrocytes, artesunate kills malaria parasites, which are then selectively removed from erythrocytes by the spleen without immediate erythrocyte destruction.
Quinine has questionable efficacy on leg cramps and a known toxicity profile involving the hematologic, renal, neurologic, cardiac, and endocrine systems (Guay, 2008).
Quinine is derived from the bark of the cinchona tree and its antimalarial properties have been recognised since the 17th century.
But while quinine could relieve a victim's suffering and provide a modicum of immunity, it was not a cure.
According to IMS Health, Quinine Sulfate Capsules USP, 324 mg had US sales of about USD31.
is to tell their heart failure patients who may be still seeking sources of quinine to avoid it, according to Dr.
Thirdly, this patient was administered 10 % dextrose with I/V quinine to counter hypoglycemia induced by intravenous quinine administration.
While in Quinine group 21 (84%) recovered completely and four (16%) died.
Quinine is a medication that has been used for many years for the treatment of cramps both in the general population and in the dialysis population (Kobrin & Berns, 2007).