quinacrine


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Related to quinacrine: mepacrine

quinacrine

 [kwin´ah-krin]
an anthelmintic and antiprotozoal agent used especially for treatment of malaria, giardiasis, and tapeworm infestations. It is a yellow fluorescent dye also used in chromosome banding.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

quinacrine

(kwĭn′ə-krēn′)
n.
A compound, C23H30ClN3O, administered in its hydrochloride form, that was formerly used as an antimalarial and antihelminthic drug and, in some countries, has been used as an agent for the nonsurgical sterilization of women.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

quinacrine

Classic cytogenetics A fluorescent dye used to stain chromosomes, especially Y chromosome Gynecology Tropical medicine An antiparasitic agent once used to manage giardiasis, helminths, malaria, protozoa, tapeworms
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

quinacrine

A yellow acridine dye useful in studying chromosomal structure because of its property of fluorescing when bound to certain regions of chromosomes. Also known as mepacrine. Quinacrine was once widely used to prevent malaria and to remove tapeworms.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Quinacrine is rapidly absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract with plasma levels increasing two-to-four hours after administration and reaching a peak in 8-12 hours.
Between 1958 and 1962, the DRV employed acriquine (quinacrine), plasmocid (antimalarine and rhodoquine) and paludrine (proguanil), drugs mostly available during the First Indochina War.
Reduction of cytostatic effects of quinacrine mustard by caffeine," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Quinacrine can be added to either hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine to achieve improvement in patients who don't respond to a single antimalarial agent.
(2.) Rowley JD: Identification of a translocation with quinacrine fluorescence in a patient with acute leukemia.
Reactive oxygen species generated by human spermatozoa is induced by exogenous NADPH and inhibited by the flavoprotein inhibitors diphenylene iodonium and quinacrine. Mol.
Often a combination of antimalarials (for example, hydroxychloroquine 200 mg and quinacrine 100 mg daily) is used when monotherapy is ineffective.8 However, appropriate time intervals (6 weeks to 3 months) must be given to allow these drugs to work maximally.
(37.) de Magalhaes DR et al., Quinacrine sterilization for human immunodeficiency virus-positive women, Fertility and Sterility, 2009, 92(1):108-115.
Safety and efficacy of quinacrine in human prion disease (RION-1 study): a patient preference trial.
Four of the most studied drugs are the analgesic flupirtine, intraventricular pentosan polysulphate, amantadine (a dopaminergic drug with anti-influenza virostatic actions) and the anti-malarial, quinacrine. However, there is insufficient evidence to introduce any into clinical practice at present (6).
(32.) Bolte J, Demuynck C, Lhomme F, Lhomme J, Barbet J, Roques BP Synthetic models related to DNA intercalating molecules: comparison between quinacrine and chloroquine in their ring-ring Interaction with adenine and thymine.