quenching


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Related to quenching: tempering, quenching oil

quenching

 [kwench´ing]
extinguishing, suppressing, or diminishing a physical property, as the rapid chilling of a hot metal by plunging it into cold liquid. The term is frequently used to describe decrease of fluorescence from an excited molecule by other molecules that absorb some of the energy, which would otherwise be emitted as light. In several specific applications, it is used in liquid scintillation counting to denote any process that results in a decrease in number or intensity of the light flashes produced, thus lowering the amount of energy recorded, and it is also used to describe the termination of secondary and subsequent ionizations in a detector to give the detector time to become sensitive again.

quench·ing

(kwench'ing),
1. The process of extinguishing, removing, or diminishing a physical property such as heat or light, for example, rapidly cooling a hot metal rapidly by plunging it into water or oil.
2. In beta liquid scintillation counting, the shifting of the energy spectrum from a true to a lower energy; it is caused by a variety of interfering materials in the counting solution, including foreign chemicals and coloring agents.
3. The process of stopping a chemical or enzymatic reaction.
[M. E. quenchen, fr. O.E. ācwencan]

quenching

/quench·ing/ (kwench´ing)
1. suppressing or diminishing a physical property, as of heat in a metal by immersion in cold liquid.
2. decrease of fluorescence from an excited molecule by other molecules that absorb some emission energy that would otherwise occur as light.
3. in liquid scintillation counting, interference with fluoresence generation or propagation, decreasing the counting efficiency.
4. the termination of secondary and subsequent ionizations in a detector to give it time to become sensitive again.

quenching

[kwen′ching]
1 a process of removing or reducing an energy source, such as heat or light.
2 stopping or diminishing a chemical or enzymatic reaction.
3 decreasing counting efficiency in beta liquid scintillation caused by interfering materials.
4 preventing emission of light from fluorescent compounds.

quench·ing

(kwench'ing)
1. The process of extinguishing, removing, or diminishing a physical property such as heat or light.
2. In beta liquid scintillation counting, the shifting of the energy spectrum from a true to a lower energy; it is caused by a variety of interfering materials in the counting solution.
3. The process of stopping a chemical or enzymatic reaction.
[M. E. quenchen, fr. O.E. ācwencan]

quenching,

n in aromatherapy, an aspect of synergetic combinations of oils in which undesired results arising from one component are neutralized by another component.

quench·ing

(kwench'ing)
1. The process of extinguishing, removing, or diminishing a physical property such as heat or light.
2. Process of stopping a chemical reaction.
[M. E. quenchen, fr. O.E. ācwencan]
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of the toxin contents on the fluorescence quenching was measured for contents from 20 to 80 ug/mL and a metal ion concentration of 0.
Furthermore, quenching parameters such as quench chamber geometry, quench orientation, flow pattern, and etc.
Yokote, "Coke Dry Quenching in Connection with Environmental Counter Measures and Energy Savings," pp.
For coupled thermal-structure analysis, higher stress occurred because of larger temperature change, which perhaps results in the plastic deformation during online quenching process.
Fluorescence Quenching of Fluoranthene by Non grafted and Grafted MAH in Twin-Screw Extruder
Analyzing the results is observed that cooling water in ultrasonic field increased the hardness of about 4 / 5% beside the quenching in water (for example, from 2218 N/[mm.
Uphill quenching was first employed in the 1950s by Alcoa with the objective of artificially aging the aluminum to produce a more stable microstructure with less residual stress.
In this paper, we give some conditions under which the solution of (9)-(11) quenches in a finite time and estimate its semidiscrete quenching time.
According to the authors, "This (testing) system has the potential of being a powerful tool to evaluate the quenching activity against singlet oxygen for various hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds.
They also provide slow cooling rates in the convection phase and flexible quenching speeds to make them suitable for applications typically limited to oil quenching, including pistons, forgings, mine shaft supports, and other high hardenability steel products.
2) AE signals induced from a low-temperature SC coil were measured when quenching took place.