quenching


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Related to quenching: tempering, quenching oil

quenching

 [kwench´ing]
extinguishing, suppressing, or diminishing a physical property, as the rapid chilling of a hot metal by plunging it into cold liquid. The term is frequently used to describe decrease of fluorescence from an excited molecule by other molecules that absorb some of the energy, which would otherwise be emitted as light. In several specific applications, it is used in liquid scintillation counting to denote any process that results in a decrease in number or intensity of the light flashes produced, thus lowering the amount of energy recorded, and it is also used to describe the termination of secondary and subsequent ionizations in a detector to give the detector time to become sensitive again.

quench·ing

(kwench'ing),
1. The process of extinguishing, removing, or diminishing a physical property such as heat or light, for example, rapidly cooling a hot metal rapidly by plunging it into water or oil.
2. In beta liquid scintillation counting, the shifting of the energy spectrum from a true to a lower energy; it is caused by a variety of interfering materials in the counting solution, including foreign chemicals and coloring agents.
3. The process of stopping a chemical or enzymatic reaction.
[M. E. quenchen, fr. O.E. ācwencan]

quench·ing

(kwench'ing)
1. The process of extinguishing, removing, or diminishing a physical property such as heat or light.
2. In beta liquid scintillation counting, the shifting of the energy spectrum from a true to a lower energy; it is caused by a variety of interfering materials in the counting solution.
3. The process of stopping a chemical or enzymatic reaction.
[M. E. quenchen, fr. O.E. ācwencan]

quench·ing

(kwench'ing)
1. The process of extinguishing, removing, or diminishing a physical property such as heat or light.
2. Process of stopping a chemical reaction.
[M. E. quenchen, fr. O.E. ācwencan]
References in periodicals archive ?
For the dynamic fluorescence quenching, its binding constant (KA) and the number of binding site (n) could be obtained by using the following Lineweaver-Burk equation:
The transient heat transfer within the plate during quenching can be described mathematically by an appropriate form of Fourier's heat conduction equation (1).
This additional numerical feature is definitely justified for ensuring expected quenching phenomena.
A short time-scale suggests that we need to look for external physical processes that are fast in quenching. Another important result of the work is that internal and external processes do not act independently of each other in shutting-off the star formation."
The heat transfer inside the solid during quenching process could be described by heat equation and corresponding boundary conditions[12], assuming no heat generation during quenching process:
In summary, the dry quenching of coke introduced in 1976 is now used at a number of plants.
There are two cooling conditions including air cooling from exit position to quenching region and water cooling during online quenching of profiles.
Collisional Quenching. When an additional constituent is added into a solution of a fluorescent species normally fluorescence quenching occurs.
It is expected that the fluorescence quenching behavior in the melting flow in the TSE should be similar to that in the organic solution.
In this article, the authors present the cooling influence in ultrasonic field on the mechanical properties of a dual-phase steel with 0.09% C and 1.90% Mn obtained by intercritical quenching. The heat treatment consisted of heating to 740[degrees]C, maintaining for 30 minutes and then cooling in water and water in ultrasonic field.
"Quenching" refers to the tricky process of cooling equipment to the required temperature in the heat treatment of metal alloys.