alternative lifestyle

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alternative lifestyle

A generic, politically sensitive term for any form of living arrangements with a significant other (e.g., close personal friend, lover, partner, spouse, etc.) in which sexual orientation differs from the usual male-female dyad—e.g., a male or female homosexual dyad.

alternative lifestyle

Alternate lifestyle, queer Social medicine A generic, 'politically sensitive' term for any form of living arrangements with a 'significant other' in which sexual orientation differs from the usual male-female dyad–eg, a male or female homosexual dyad
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Men's first album, Talk About Body (released this month on IAmSound Records), is a postmodern collection of danceable anthems, reminiscent of the Talking Heads, a primary influence on the band, though Men is more concerned with queer lifestyle issues.
A fatigued Seymour hurriedly abandons the reservation once again, returns home to his relatively assimilated queer lifestyle in Seattle and embraces his white male lover, Steven (Kevin Phillip), in bed.
As Seymour flees Mouse's wake to rejoin his queer lifestyle with Steven in Seattle, Seymour's adult repulsion from Two-Spirit traditions and the Spokane reservation climaxes.
Things are hunky-dory until the singer's 8-year-old sister is taken into foster care because of her older sister's queer lifestyle.
Responding to the relative neglect of gay themes in the critical literature on contemporary Berlin, this essay focuses on recent novels that explore new representational strategies for depicting the ambiguous relation between queer lifestyle performances, capitalist consumer society, and the media industry before and after the fall of the Wall.
The novels discussed in this essay are selected for their considerable formal and thematic diversity, which nonetheless is centered on the interplay of queer lifestyle performances with capitalist consumer society and its cultural traditions, a space that these performances negotiate through a complex dialectic of affirmation and subversion.
Schacht's depictions include references to homophobic stereotypes about queer lifestyle promoted by heterosexist ideologies: "Das Gerucht, dass schwule Singles standig, dauernd und uberall tollen Sex haben, ist offenbar in die Welt gesetzt worden, um die Heteros zu demoralisieren" (176).
While Butler is generally interested in deconstructing the seemingly natural gender structure in the context of compulsory heterosexuality and phallogocentric language, in order to allow for the recognition of a diverse range of alternative notions of sexuality, gender, and the body, her theoretical flame-work can be usefully adapted for an analysis of the multiple ways in which contemporary fiction opens up representational spaces for the construction of queer lifestyles in Berlin's cultural topography.
He focuses especially on foreign and low-budget films, and on films that bring honest representations of the queer lifestyle to the screen.
Everything about the queer lifestyle seems to demand eternal, unending youth.
This silencing occurs in many ways, including through a lack of visibility for queer people and through the loss of community that can result from the normalisation of queer lifestyles.
Normalisation, in relation to heteronormativity, describes the process that occurs when aspects of queer lifestyles become accepted as part of the societal norm.