malariae malaria

(redirected from quartan fever)

ma·lar·i·ae ma·lar·i·a

a malarial fever with paroxysms that typically recur every 72 hours or every fourth day, reckoning the day of the paroxysm as the first; due to the schizogony and release of merozoites from infected cells, with invasion of new red blood corpuscles by Plasmodium malariae.

ma·lar·i·ae ma·la·ri·a

(mă-lar'ē-ē mă-lar'ē-ă)
A malarial fever with paroxysms that recur every 72 hours or every fourth day, reckoning the day of the paroxysm as the first; due to the schizogony and release of merozoites from infected cells, with invasion of new red blood corpuscles by Plasmodium malariae.
Synonym(s): quartan malaria.

Patient discussion about malariae malaria

Q. Malaria threatening? My cousin suffering from malaria but is it not as serious as some have suggested. Though its beginning is very old past, is it still threatening for someone even after we have enough medicine? Is the available medicine is enough are still anyone is researching about it?

A. Hi Abrham, I have provided a video url for you. Hope this will help you a lot.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AULg2ZM3Xic

More discussions about malariae malaria
References in periodicals archive ?
Hippocrates was the first to clearly describe the different types of malaria depending upon the periodicity of the fever--tertian and quartan fever patterns.
Nature of Man, which best describes humor theory, proposes a new humor in place of water: black bile, causing diseases of the kidneys, spleen, liver, quartan fever, headaches, and epilepsy.
5) A self-avowed melancholic born under the sign of Saturn,(6) Ficino attributes quartan fever to a poor combustion of melancholy humor: "If black bile .
The item on Atticus' estate in Epirus (66-78) looks like a meritorious piece of research (I cannot speak with knowledge of the topography), including the interesting suggestion that Atticus' quartan fever and the ill health of his wife and daughter derived from this malarial source.
I gave him two drams of opium, but he suffered from quartan fever, and its crisis halted the effect of the drug.
This may well have enhanced transmission rates, for Thomas Sydenham described an epidemic of tertian and some quartan fevers in 1661, which "was doing frightful mischief' by August.