quartan


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Related to quartan: tertian, quartan malaria, quartan fever

quartan

 [kwor´tan]
1. recurring in four-day cycles (i.e. on the third day after the previous episode).
2. a variety of intermittent fever in which the paroxysms recur on every third day; see malaria.

quar·tan

(kwōr'tan),
Recurring every fourth day, including the first day of an episode in the computation, that is, after a free interval of 2 days.
[L. quartanus, relating to a fourth (thing)]

quartan

(kwôrt′n)
adj.
Occurring every fourth day, counting inclusively, or every 72 hours. Used of a fever.
n.
A malarial fever recurring every 72 hours.

quar·tan

(kwōr'tăn)
Recurring every fourth day, including the first day of an episode in the computation, i.e., after a free interval of 2 days.
See also: malariae malaria
[L. quartanus, relating to a fourth (thing)]

quartan

Recurring on the fourth day, as in the case of the fever in quartan MALARIA.

quar·tan

(kwōr'tǎn)
Recurring every fourth day, including the first day of an episode in computation, i.e., after a free interval of 2 days.
[L. quartanus, relating to a fourth (thing)]
References in periodicals archive ?
But we also saw that such an ambitious claim is not followed up--we never find out the exact relationship of a quartan fever to such-and-such a humoral mixture, for example--and, further, that those very works also contain hints of an irreducibly higher level, which links the concepts of [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
The identity of diseases described in early literature is often uncertain, but fevers with a periodicity described as tertian or quartan are highly suggestive of malaria.
During the Medieval Warm Period, mention of malarialike illness was common in the European literature from Christian Russia to caliphate Spain: "As one who has the shivering of the quartan so near,/that he has his nails already pale/and trembles all, still keeping the shade,/such I became when those words were uttered." (The Inferno, Dante [1265-1321]).
This may well have enhanced transmission rates, for Thomas Sydenham described an epidemic of tertian and some quartan fevers in 1661, which "was doing frightful mischief' by August.
Pliny reaches for her assistance again in Chapter 18 when he comes to discuss the uses of urine good for the eyes and, when mixed with the white of an egg (ostrich preferably), effective against sunburn (28.66)--and in Chapter 23 where he notes that not all the properties of menses are noxious, since both Lais and Salpe hold that properly deployed it can act as an antidote to rabies and the tertian and quartan fevers (28.82).
85-90) thus: "As one who has the shivering-fit of the quartan so near that his nails are already pale, and he trembles all over at the mere sight of shade, such I became at these words of his; but shame rebuked me, which makes a servant brave in the presence of a good master."
Hippocrates was the first to clearly describe the different types of malaria depending upon the periodicity of the fever--tertian and quartan fever patterns.
Seventy-two hours the paroxysm is on the fourth day, hence the name quartan ague.
The intervals when crises occur in irregular fevers, quartans, quintans, septans and nonanes, should also be considered".
malariae was considered an important cause of chronic malarial nephropathy (quartan malarial nephropathy) (5).
The nephritic syndrome in Uganda and its association with quartan malaria.