quarantine

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quarantine

 [kwor´an-tēn]
1. restriction of freedom of movement of apparently well individuals who have been exposed to infectious disease, which is imposed for the usual maximal incubation period of the disease (quarantine period).
2. a period of detention of vessels, vehicles, or travelers coming from infected or suspected ports or places.
3. the place where persons are detained for inspection.
4. to detain or isolate on account of suspected contagion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

quar·an·tine

(kwar'an-tēn),
1. A period (originally 40 days) of detention of vessels and their passengers coming from an area where an infectious disease prevails.
2. To detain such vessels and their passengers until the incubation period of an infectious disease has passed.
3. A place where such vessels and their passengers are detained.
4. The isolation of a person with a known or possible contagious disease.
[It. quarantina fr. L. quadraginta, forty]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

quarantine

(kwôr′ən-tēn′, kwŏr′-)
n.
1.
a. A condition, period of time, or place in which a person, animal, plant, vehicle, or amount of material suspected of carrying an infectious agent is kept in confinement or isolated in an effort to prevent disease from spreading.
b. An action resulting in such a condition: the government's quarantine of the animals.
2.
a. An action to isolate another nation, such as a blockade of its ports or a severance of diplomatic or trade relations.
b. The condition of being isolated by such an action.
3. Computers The isolation of data or data transmissions in order to keep viruses, worms, or other malware from infecting a computer or computer network.
tr.v. quaran·tined, quaran·tining, quaran·tines
To isolate in quarantine.

quar′an·tin′a·ble adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

quarantine

Epidemiology
noun A period of isolation intended to control the spread of a contagious infection.
 
verb To restrict the freedom of movement in those with—or presumed to have been exposed to—a highly communicable disease so as to prevent dissemination.
 
Military medicine
noun Isolation of anyone who is suffering from a disease that can be spread, or isolation of carriers and personnel who may be responsible for the spread of diseases, such as typhoid.
 
Types
• Absolute quarantine—Consists of complete isolation from contact with other persons or units. The quarantined person’s normal duties are suspended and all contacts avoided.
• Working quarantine—Relaxed isolation where unnecessary contacts with other persons or units are contained, regular duties are still carried out, but infected persons are kept isolated and preventive measures are taken to avoid spreading of the disease.
 
Transfusion medicine
noun A term of art referring to an “on-hold” status of a blood component from the time it is collected from a donor until all required testing is completed, after which time it is released and distributed to end-users and recipients.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

quarantine

Epidemiology noun A period of isolation intended to control the spread of a contagious infection verb To restrict the freedom of movement in those with–or presumed to have been exposed to–a highly communicable disease, to prevent dissemination. See Notifiable disease, Proposition 64.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

quar·an·tine

(kwōr'ǎn-tēn, -tēn')
1. The restriction of activities of contacts (potentially infected but currently asymptomatic hosts) for a time at least equal to the period of communicability for the disease in question.
Compare: isolation
2. To apply quarantine measures.
[It. quarantina fr. L. quadraginta, forty]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

quarantine

Isolation of a person who has been exposed to an infectious disease so as to prevent spread. From the Italian quarantina, 40-a period of days longer than the incubation period of most diseases, other than RABIES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

quar·an·tine

(kwōr'ǎn-tēn)
1. Isolation of a person with a known or possible contagious disease.
2. A period (originally 40 days) of detention of vessels and their passengers coming from an area where an infectious disease prevails.
3. A place where such vessels and their passengers are detained.
[It. quarantina fr. L. quadraginta, forty]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(18) Part I of this note describes a brief history of the development of quarantine laws in the United States and China, the United States legal quarantine scheme and the constitutional issues at stake, as well as China's approach to quarantine.
Dorf, a professor at Cornell University Law School, said there may not be a sound legal case to challenge a quarantine. The state laws used to implement mandatory quarantines in New York, New Jersey and Illinois are clear and "there is no serious doubt about the affirmative power of either the states and the federal government to quarantine," Mr.
Responding to concerns that mandatory quarantine would inhibit doctors and nurses from traveling to West Africa, Cuomo said New York wanted to encourage personnel to go, lauding their "valor" and "compassion," while also protecting public safety at home.
Both the federal and state governments have authority to impose isolation and quarantine measures to help prevent the spread of infectious diseases.
The Department of State continues to receive reports about poor quarantine conditions, including the unavailability of suitable drinking water and food, unsanitary conditions, the lack of telephone access, the absence of English-speaking staff, and limited availability of English-language interpreters.
In order to theorize the effects and implications of self-quarantine, it is necessary to understand how quarantines function to create spaces and thus define bodies.
Although the national quarantine director believed that pandemic influenza had entered Australia before quarantine was established, this belief was not documented, and other reports indicate that some ships' officers and soldiers returning to Australia from Europe had concealed illness to avoid protracted quarantine (18).
* Isolation, quarantine and other actions by civil authorities may create unintended backlash from individuals or groups that believe their civil rights have been violated (breaking quarantine, violence against civil authorities, theft of drugs/medical equipment).
Elsewhere, "openfaced sneezers" were fined and the District of Columbia imposed blanket quarantines that restricted residents to their homes.
* Isolation of ill patients and quarantine of incoming individuals are being used with moderate success.
Travel to and from (as well as within) East Asia has dried up, and the number of government-imposed quarantines is being surpassed by self-imposed quarantines.
High risk groups, such as the homosexual community, have consistently opposed quarantines for fear that status alone, such as homosexuality, will be enough for the Health Department to have cause to believe that individuals are engaging in at-risk behavior.