quantify

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quantify

verb To determine the quantity of; measure
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Nunberg's argument, the key properties of our abstract impression of information-as-substance, those he calls the syntactic properties of quantifiability, uniformity, and morselization (or boundedness), and the semantic properties of objectivity and autonomy, "are simply the reifications of the various principles of interpretation" (p.
In clinical work, there are other, indeed, strongly held concepts for which there is no quantifiability, such as transference, countertransference or self-object.
A set of ideas have accumulated around this claim: objectivity, reliability, quantifiability and authoritative political and policy utility.
Focusing on changes in a single attribute has the advantage of enhancing quantifiability.
Impact categories classify each cost or benefit according to its quantifiability and predictability.
When Dennis and Donella Meadows wrote Limits to Growth several years later, out of the Club of Rome findings, they were a bit more strident in their cautionary tale, and plotted five or six of the primary behavioral tendencies of human consumers with regard to waste, energy use, affluents being ejected into the troposphere, a number of quantifiable pieces of data that they collected, analyzed on a computer at a time when people weren't analyzing data on computers, and recognized the trends, all of which Ehrlich had intimated but which gave a new generation of quantifiability.
Given that fitness is the sole notion I have identified as an unreduced teleological primitive, and conceding its quantifiability, teleosemanticists and those committed to the explication of intentional and representational phenomena by appeal to functional properties may even claim that their accounts are reductive of the traditionally problematic features associated with semantic and intentional notions, i.