quadratus femoris

quadratus femoris

A muscle of the hip/thigh located at the upper lateral border of tuberosity of ischium.
 
Action
Lateral adduction and rotation of thigh.
 
Nerve
L4, L5, S1.
 
Insertion
Quadrate tubercle of femur, intertrochanteric crest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kalenderer et al .[3] presented a case with HO in the quadratus femoris muscle reclining from the femur to the pelvis.
Additionally, there was severe edema involving the left hip adductor muscles (quadratus femoris, obturator externus, and obturator internus), high-grade partial thickness tearing of the adductor magnus muscle at its femoral attachment, and highgrade partial thickness tearing of the obturator internus muscle at its iliac attachment.
The sciatic nerve rests on the ischium and then passes posterior to the obturator internus, quadratus femoris, and adductor magnus muscles.
[5] also reported a case of a quadratus femoris tear in a patient presenting with persistent sciatica.
The gemelli muscles, together with piriformis, obturator internus, obturator externus and quadratus femoris, are deep muscles of the hip joint.
Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of a presacral epidural inflammatory collection with associated septic spondylodiscitis of the 5th lumbar and 1st sacral vertebrae and abscesses of multiple muscles (pyomyositis) including psoas, gluteus maximus, and quadratus femoris, the largest among them measuring 12.1cm x 6.7 cm (Figures 1(a) and 1(b)).
Ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) is characterized by a narrowed space between the ischial tuberosity and the lesser trochanter resulting in repetitive impingement of the quadratus femoris muscle (Figure 4).
The quadratus femoris muscle appeared healthy distally.
After articular capsule and short external rotators (Including piriformis, superior gemellus, inferior gemellus, quadratus femoris) were reattached to the posterior border of the greater trochanter by several bone holes after replacement, one of our researchers, who did not involve in the operation and in evaluation of the results, was responsible for opening these envelopes and preparing the study medication.
The mechanism of injury of the quadratus femoris in a tennis player was speculated to be due to a strong eccentric contraction in a closed kinetic chain to try to control hip internal rotation during the end phase of serving (2).
Various types of osteosynthesis options available are valgus osteotomy, free or vascularised fibular graft,[2] quadratus femoris muscle pedicle graft,[3] combined osteotomy with fibular graft[2] and Non vascularised cortical autografts.

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