qinghaosu


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qinghaosu

(ching-how-sū),
Chinese herbal used as an antimalarial, contains artemisinins as a major component.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tu, "The discovery of artemisinin (qinghaosu) and gifts from Chinese medicine," Nature Medicine, vol.
Isolation of artemisinin (qinghaosu) from Artemisia annua growing in the United States.
(3) Artesunate, a derivative of the ancient Chinese herb qinghaosu (artemisinin), has been shown to have a mortality benefit of 34.7% over quinine in adults and 22.5% in children with severe falciparum malaria.
Magic bullets to conquer malaria; from quinine to qinghaosu.
I have published the most current textbook on Artemisia derivatives, including Artemisinin (qinghaosu) and many other toxic forms that should be avoided.
Both combination treatments are types of artemisinin, whose active ingredient derives from a plant called Artemesia annua, also known as qinghaosu or sweet wormwood.
It is derived from Artemisia annua, also known as sweet wormwood, which had been used in Chinese medicine for centuries under the name Qinghaosu.
Otro tipo de farmacos antimalaricos lo constituyen el sesquiterpeno artemisinin (18, qinghaosu) (22) y sus derivados semisinteticos (19, trioxanos, figura 5).
Artemisinin, a compound based on qinghaosu, or sweet wormwood, was first isolated in 1965 by Chinese military researchers.
* A `new' anti-malarial is a drug called Qinghaosu, derived from the sweet wormwood (Qinghao) plant (genus Artemisia).
More than 20 years ago, Chinese scientists confirmed the antimalarial qualities of artemisinin, known in Chinese as qinghaosu (pronounced ching-how-soo).
However, they say this dietary therapy may prove even more effective when used in conjucntion with oxidizing drugs, such as the Chinese herbal remedy qinghaosu, now being explored as a malaria treatment by the World Health Organization.