q-sort


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q-sort

 [ku´sort]
a technique of personality assessment in which the subject (or an observer) indicates the degree to which a standardized set of descriptive statements applies to the subject.

q-sort

(ku´sort) a technique of personality assessment in which the subject (or an observer) indicates the degree to which a standardized set of descriptive statements applies to the subject.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Q-sort methodology was used to assess paternal sensitive behaviour during father-child interactions in everyday situations (Pederson & Moran, 1995).
After the stories were completed, they were coded using the Attachment Story Completion Task Q-Sort (Miljkovitch et al.
Appendices include the major versions of Q-sort instruments in use: e.
The summative method described the most and least common beliefs on each of the three Q-sort sets (see Table 1).
Parent interviews followed a Q-sort methodology in which respondents were asked to sort items of importance, indicating that an item was important to not important (McKeown & Thomas, 1988).
The SWAP-200-A Q-sort uses 200 questions that describe an adolescent's functional behavior on a numerical scale: A "1" rating means the patient does not exhibit this behavior, while a "7" rating indicates that she typifies that behavior.
The Q-sort technique and instructions for the validation panel replicated those for the Pilot Panel.
The second phase of research used the findings from phase one to develop a list of potential names and statements for the FFS product and tested them using Q-sort methodology.
The interview included a number of semi-construced open-ended questions concerning several subjects and some Q-sort instructions (The parents had to select 5 out of 15 characteristics for both "a fine parent" and " a fine child," defined as their "favorite qualities," which seemed the most important at that moment for all of the family members).
We used the Attachment Interview Q-Sort (Kobak, Cole, Ferenz-Gillies, Fleming, & Gamble, 1993) to derive security and deactivation scores for the entire sample of mothers.
self-esteem); child-rearing attitudes; the father's accessibility, engagement, and responsibility; and Q-sort descriptions of the infant's attachment behavior with the father.
The items so arranged make up what is called a Q-sort.