pyruvic acid


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pyruvic acid

 [pi-roo´vik]
a compound formed in the body in aerobic metabolism of carbohydrate; also formed by dry distillation of tartaric acid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

py·ru·vic ac·id

(pī-rū'vik as'id),
2-Oxopropanoic acid; α-ketopropionic acid; acetylformic acid; pyroacemic acid; the simplest α-keto acid; an intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate; in thiamin deficiency, its oxidation is retarded and it accumulates in the tissues, especially in nervous structures. The enol form, enol pyruvic acid, when phosphorylated, plays an important metabolic role. See: phosphoenolpyruvic acid.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pyruvic acid

(pī-ro͞o′vĭk, pĭ-)
n.
A colorless organic liquid, C3H4O3, formed as an intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation and as an end product in glycolysis.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

py·ru·vic ac·id

(pī-rū'vik as'id)
An intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrate; in thiamin deficiency, its oxidation is retarded and it accumulates in the tissues.
See also: phosphoenolpyruvic acid
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Pyruvic acidclick for a larger image
Fig. 264 Pyruvic acid . Molecular structure.

pyruvic acid

or

pyruvate

an important 3-carbon molecule formed from GLUCOSE and GLYCEROL in glycolysis (see Fig. 264 ). See also ACETYLCOENZYME A. Pyruvic acid is broken down further, the precise reactions depending upon whether oxygen is present or not. See AEROBIC RESPIRATION, ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: FIGURE 3: AMMI biplot for (a) yield and (b) pyruvic acid content showing genotypes and trials.
The assessments performed in this study proved that pyruvic acid is effective in the treatment of lung cancer due to its ability to destroy the lung cancer cell line A549 without effects on the MRC-5 normal lung fibroblast cell line.
While the content of formic acid, acetic acid and quinic acid partially increased marginally, the concentration of pyruvic acid is altogether lower than during the initial measurement.
2A, the mass spectrum of a [HbA.sub.1b] fraction isolated from a patient with glycogenose type I includes peaks that correspond to the [alpha]-chain (15 127 Da), the pyruvic acid adduct of the [beta]-chain (15 938 Da), and the latter's decarboxylated form (15 894 Da).
Rather than being genetically modified, the onion has been specially bred and grown in low-sulphur soils, which halves its pyruvic acid content--the substance that irritates tear ducts, skin and nostrils when an onion's flesh is cut and exposed to the air.
Rather than being genetically modified, the new onion has been specially bred and grown in low-sulphur soils to cut its pyruvic acid content by half.
Onions cause tears because they contain high quantities of pyruvic acid which is released when an onion is cut and exposed to the air.
Thiamin-deficient pigs have elevated blood pyruvic acid and lactic acid levels and reduced appetite.
Pyruvic acid causes tears to stream down chefs' cheeks, in an effort to repel the fumes.
It's the pyruvic acid in sulfur that causes one's eyes to sting and tear when cutting onions, and it can sometimes cause indigestion.
According to the company, its Creapure Citrate is the ideal solution regarding taste and solubility and its Creapure Purovate (protected by compostion, manufacturing and application patents) is an ideal combination of creatine and pyruvic acid in a 60:40 ratio, which brings together the power of creatine and the endurance of pyruvate.