pyrometer

(redirected from pyrometry)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

py·rom·e·ter

(pī-rom'ĕ-tĕr),
An instrument for measuring high degrees of heat, beyond the capacity of a mercury or gas thermometer.
[pyro- + G. metron, measure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pyrometer

(pī-rŏm′ĕ-tĕr) [″ + metron, measure]
A device for measuring a very high temperature.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Small variations of the gas composition are not critical.[3] However, it has been found that small additions of water vapor are beneficial, yielding consistently >90[degrees]K superconducting transition temperatures.[3] The sample temperature during deposition, determined by infrared pyrometry, is 670[degrees]C with an estimated accuracy of 20[degrees]C.
"We are seeing the beginning of the use of radiation pyrometry to sense part temperature and produce a temperature-control signal that modulates either induction-heating time or power levels.
For this reason, polymer melts having the same melt temperature may be detected as having different melt temperatures via IR pyrometry. To investigate potential issues associated with color, high impact polystyrene (HIPS) was compounded with multiple color additives and experimentally investigated with an instrumented injection mold.
His current research deals with topics related to combustion, alternative energy sources, air pollution and acid rain prevention, incineration of municipal wastes, engine performance and emissions, combustion diagnostics and pyrometry, polymers, materials development, and polymeric coatings.
They discuss the origin and propagation of electromagnetic radiation; the photometric basics including mapping the radiation source area to the area of the sensor or sensor array; the characteristics of infrared optical sensors and sensor arrays; noise sources; the structure and characteristics of thermal infrared sensors; and applications in pyrometry, thermal imaging cameras, passive infrared motion detectors, gas analysis, and spectrometry.
For example, some of the very early practitioners of optical pyrometry were the earliest metal workers, who visually determined the correct temperature at which to begin forming or tempering their metal implements.
A standard two-color pyrometry program converts the video data to temperature readings.