pyloric

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pyloric

 [pi-lor´ik]
pertaining to the pylorus or to the pyloric part of the stomach.
pyloric stenosis obstruction of the pyloric orifice of the stomach; it may be congenital, as in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, or acquired, due to peptic ulceration or prepyloric carcinoma.

The initial symptom is vomiting, mild at first but becoming increasingly more forceful. It can occur both during and after feedings. Diagnosis may be confirmed by x-ray examination using a barium meal.

Treatment is usually surgical, involving longitudinal splitting of the muscle (pyloromyotomy).
Congenital pyloric stenosis. The abnormal narrowing of the opening of the pylorus causes episodes of projectile vomiting. From Frazier et al., 2000.

py·lor·ic

(pī-lōr'ik),
Relating to the pylorus.

pyloric

(pī-lôr′ĭk, pĭ-)
adj.
Of or relating to the pylorus.

py·lor·ic

(pī-lōr'ik)
Relating to the pylorus.

pyloric

of or relating to that end of the vertebrate stomach which opens into the intestine. The other end is called the cardiac area of the stomach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pyloric obstruction associated with peptic ulcer: a clinicopathological analysis of 158 surgically treated cases.
Pyloric obstruction due to gastric tuberculosis – An endoscopic diagnosis.
Supernumerary pyloric pancreas and pyloric obstruction. Br J Surg 1963; 50: 787-790.
The most common findings include a filling defect or mass in the duodenum, a gallstone in the duodenum, duodenal or pyloric obstruction, cholecystoduodenal fistula, and pneumobilia.
Pyloric obstruction due to gastric tuberculosis: An endoscopic diagnosis.
In January 1881, Billroth's chief assistant, Anton Wolfler, a 30 year old Czech, called his chief to see a 43 year old housewife, Frau Therese Heller, who had all the clinical features of a malignant tumour producing pyloric obstruction. Her symptoms dated back to October of the previous year and by now she was continuously vomiting, wasted, bed-ridden and with a thin rapid pulse.
Most serious problems associated with feeding tubes are preventable and include pyloric obstruction from tube migration, leakage, fasciaitis, and wound infection.|9-11~ These complications can rapidly result in significant morbidity and unnecessary discomfort for the resident if the cause is not determined and if corrective actions are not instituted quickly.
Mucosal disruption Peptic ulcer disease Pyloric obstruction Bowel obstruction Rupture jejunal diverticula Surgery Endoscopy Biliary stent perforation Sclerotherapy Intracatheter jejunostomy tube Blunt abdominal trauma Trauma of child abuse Hirshsprung disease Crohn disease Ulcerative colitis Systemic amyloidosis 3.
The complications of the Rapunzel syndrome ranges from attacks of incomplete pyloric obstruction to complete obstruction of the bowel, perforation of bowel leading to peritonitis and mortality.3,7 Trichobezoars with small bowel extensions may produce other complications, namely bleeding, perforation, protein losing enteropathies, steatorrhoea, pancreatitis, appendicitis, and intussusceptions.3,6,7
Vomiting was both spontaneous and induced type, frequency was 2-3 times per day and frequency gradually increased as the pyloric obstruction developed.
Covered versus uncovered self- expandable metallic stents for palliation of malignant pyloric obstruction in gastric cancer patients: a randomized, prospective study.
Pyloric obstruction by a phytobezoar following a pyloroplasty and vagotomy.