putrefaction


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Related to putrefaction: intestinal putrefaction

putrefaction

 [pu″trĕ-fak´shun]
enzymatic decomposition, especially of proteins, with the production of foul-smelling compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and mercaptans. adj., adj putrefac´tive.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn),
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

putrefaction

/pu·tre·fac·tion/ (pu″trĕ-fak´shun) enzymatic decomposition, especially of proteins, with the production of foul-smelling compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and mercaptans.putrefac´tive

putrefaction

(pyo͞o′trə-făk′shən)
n.
1. Decomposition of organic matter, especially protein, by microorganisms, resulting in production of foul-smelling matter.
2. An amount of putrefied matter or an odor produced by such matter.

putrefaction

[pyo̅o̅′trəfak′shən]
Etymology: L, puter, rotten, facere, to make
the decay of enzymes, especially proteins, that produces foul-smelling compounds, such as ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and mercaptans. putrefactive, adj.

infanticide

Forensic medicine The active or semi-passive killing of a viable conceptus > 20 gestational wks, which breathes spontaneously. See Battered child syndrome, Child abuse. Cf Stillbirth.
Infanticide, diagnosis of  
'Hard' criteria
•  Comparison of gastric fluid composition with that of a toilet bowel-active drowning
•  Peural surfaces with petechiae Seen in induced suffocation, most significant when coupled with hematomas and petechiae on the mouth and epiglottis; the lingual frenulum may be torn and the lips bruised, indicating active attempts to suffocate infant.
•  Lungs Stillbirth lungs are not aerated and do not float
•  Edematous foam on nostrils An indicator of active breathing
•  Meconium Resuscitation of a true stillborn may push meconium into the perianal region, but extensive staining of the placenta and umbilical cord is due to antenatal stress
'Soft' criteria
•  Denial of pregnancy If the woman is obese or a dullard, she may not know she was pregnant
•  Rigor mortis A finding that is poorly appreciated in neonates
•  Impression of the body in soil, blood, or fomites, requiring diligent and timely scene investigation
•  Maceration of skin A finding typical of stillbirth
•  Putrefaction Stillborns do not putrefy as they have sterile bowels
•  Umbilical cord A cut cord indicates active intervention-time undetermined; an intact cord is consistent with stillbirth
•  Determination of age Viability, most fetuses born before 18 wks of gestation die despite resuscitative efforts, age is determined by skeletal dating, antenatal studies corroborating fetal death, eg Spaulding sign of in utero death characterized by overlapping cranial bones  

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn)
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter, usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition.
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

putrefaction

the decomposition of proteins, which gives rise to foul-smelling products.

putrefaction (pyōōˈ·tr·fakˑ·shn),

n the decomposition of protein compounds.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn)
Decomposition or rotting, breakdown of organic matter usually by bacterial action, resulting in formation of other substances of less complex constitution with evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (3) .
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

putrefaction (pū´trəfak´shən),

n the rotting of matter through the use of enzymes, producing substances such as ammonia, mercaptans, and hydrogen sulfide.

putrefaction

enzymatic decomposition, especially of proteins, with the production of foul-smelling compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia and mercaptans. Called also decomposition.
References in periodicals archive ?
5%) Gunshot 12 Trauma 103 Miscellaneous 32 Putrefaction 52 Unknown 142 * Parentheses indicate number of birds in which a pathogenic organism was detected in combination with agrochemical poisoning.
Further, this reference to putrefaction is hardly an isolated one: there is an insistent emphasis in bestiary texts on detritus (rotting flesh, excrement), and on its inextricable connection to generation.
But situated in the garden, exposed to rain and putrefaction, the artist wanted to show that all absolute powers of the world will be overcome by time.
There is putrefaction and fermentation which produces foul smell, breeding flies and polluting the environment.
Ainsi, l'economie orleanaise depend surtout d'elements exogenes: les activites 'lees a la Oche, l'arti-sanat des eaux courantes sont secondaires tandis que l'econo-mie fongique de la putrefaction est infime.
Lind believed, like his contemporaries, that scurvy was caused by the putrefaction of partially digested food in the intestinal tract.
The wind also carries waste, dust and gases caused by decomposition and added that putrefaction of waste in sunlight during daytime results in bad smells and reduced visibility.
At this time, he was examining various ways of making air noxious: by the putrefaction of dead mice or cabbage, by the fumes of burning charcoal, by mice breathing the air, or by candles burning out in it (all processes that exhaust the oxygen, in today's terms).
According to the broadly accepted scientific doctrine, this is the result of exploding carcasses: Putrefaction gases produced during the decomposition process cause the carcass to swell and burst.
In Rambler 47 Johnson writes that "the putrefaction of [a] stagnant life" can only be "scoured away" by "exercise and motion" (204); and in the same essay he says that "whoever shall keep his thoughts equally busy will find himself equally unaffected with irretrievable losses" (203).
It is thought to be promoted by putrefaction, fermentation and decay exacerbated by insufficient consumption of acid free neutral liquids--especially water.
In the course of putrefaction, bacteria emergent from the digestive tract, in association with other bacteria, became saturated therewith, and were alleged prime causal factors of spontaneous combustion.