practice

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practice

 [prak´tis]
the exercise of a profession.
collaborative practice communication, sharing, and problem solving between the physician and nurse as peers; this pattern of practice also implies a shared responsibility and accountability for patient care.
differentiated practice the use of nursing staff in an acute care setting according to their expertise and qualifications.
evidence-based practice provision of health care that incorporates the most current and valid research results.
family practice the medical specialty of a family physician, concerned with the planning and provision of comprehensive primary health care, regardless of age or sex, on a continuing basis. Called also family medicine.
general practice old term for comprehensive medical care regardless of age of the patient or presence of a condition that may require the services of a specialist; this term has now largely been replaced by the term family practice.
nursing practice see nursing practice.

prac·tice

(prak'tis),
The exercise of the profession of medicine or one of the allied health professions.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]

practice

(prăk′tĭs)
v.
To engage in the profession of medicine or one of the allied health professions.
n.
1. The exercise of the profession of medicine.
2. The business of a practicing physician or group of physicians, including facilities and customary patients.

practice

Medspeak-US
The place where a physician practises medicine in a privately managed setting. (Termed “surgery” in the UK.)

Sports medicine (US)
verb To train at a particular activity; see Spring practice.
 
Vox populi
noun A habit; the manner of performing something.

verb (practise, BrE) To perform the art and science of medicine.

practice

Medtalk noun Surgery–British The place where a physician practices medicine in a privately managed setting. See Better practice, Family practice, General practice, Group practice, Independent practice, Integrated group practice, Malpractice, Office practice, Reduced-risk practice, Solo practice Sports medicine To train at a particular activity. See Spring practice Vox populi.
A habit, manner of performing something. See Good laboratory practice, Good manufacturing practice, Malpractice, Office practice, Reduced-risk practice, Solo practice, Spring practice verb To perform the art and science of medicine.

prac·tice

(prak'tis)
1. Direct professional involvement in health care services.
2. Rehearsal of a task or skill with the goal of achieving proficiency.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]

prac·tice

(prak'tis)
Exercise of the profession of dentistry, medicine, or one of the allied health professions.
[Mediev. L. practica, business, G. praktikos, pertaining to action]

Patient discussion about practice

Q. does anyone practice bikram-yoga and know misuse of knee that can result from it? I just started this type of youga 2 weeks ago but do it 3-4 times a week and now I have a pain in the knee- like an inflamation from the pressure or something... Is anyone into bikram and know how can I prevent that from happening???

A. hi...This is Prashantmurti...I m a Yoga Teacher by profession...
In a straight way I will recommannd you to do a traditional Yoga...not like Vikram yoga or hot yoga...even Ramdev's Yoga has a possibility of high side effects...
If possible fing a yoga teacher or instution of Satyananda Yoga (bihar Yoga)in ur location, which is very practical,traditional, simple and effective...better not to do vikram yoga ..give some rest to ur knees and after that go thru Satyananda Yoga.
(prashantmurti@yahoo.com)
Happy New Year

More discussions about practice
References in periodicals archive ?
If these ideas are put into practice, there will inevitably follow an unheard-of reign of terror."
Psychologist Todd Campbell gives four steps you can put into practice right now to help get your thought house in order and eliminate scatterbrained tendencies:
We must put into practice the true way of the people of Israel, the way of the Torah."
Service learning provides a viable transition from classroom to an environment where their classroom knowledge is tested and put into practice. "The business school's very mission is enmeshed with a commitment to interact with and improve the business communities that surround the campus" (Black, 2002, p.
Peer review information provides insight into a firm's stated quality standards and how those standards are put into practice in auditing and accounting engagements.
Delineating ideas that have been successfully put into practice for years, Growing People Through Small Groups discusses the importance of staying in touch with God's will, stages and principles that people follow for individual development, knowing when a study group is ready to be transplanted and learn on their own, the role of the leader as gardener and shepherd, and much more.
Apparently their stint in Basra has seen them put into practice lessons they learned while patrolling in Northern Ireland.
One that they put into practice was called "smash monogamy," which meant that no one should have an exclusive relationship with anyone and everyone should sleep with everyone.
The Committee of Member States' Permanent Representatives to the EU (COREPER) has to reach a unanimous decision on June 23 about whether all the conditions have been met to allow the EU legislation to be put into practice next January.
Indeed, the relentlessly contingent nature of theater can make quests for aboriginal authenticity seem delusory and even dangerous when put into practice; witness O'Connor's account of the New Globe production of 1999 where the audience, primed somehow to behave like Old Globe groundlings, greeted a sympathetically modernist portrayal of Shylock with what they believed were historically correct hisses (420-21)!
Within India--on instructions sent out from London--doctors were ordered to put into practice the denial that cholera and smallpox were communicable diseases which could be controlled by the isolation of the sick (in special hospital wards) or through the quarantine of the crew and passengers of ships.
This was subsequently formalized in the UK Prison Design Briefing System (PDBS 1989) and the Woolf Report (1991) advocating the construction of wings for small groups of 50-70 inmates, and put into practice in triangular houses at HMP Woodhill (Milton Keynes 1991), Doncaster and Lancaster Farms.