purulent


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purulent

 [pu´roo-lent]
1. pertaining to or consisting of pus.
2. containing pus.
3. suppurative.
4. caused by pus.

pur·u·lent

(pyūr'ŭ-lĕnt, pyūr'ū-),
Containing, consisting of, or forming pus.

purulent

(pyo͝or′ə-lənt, pyo͝or′yə-)
adj.
Containing, discharging, or causing the production of pus: a purulent infection.

pu′ru·lent·ly adv.

purulent

[pyo̅o̅r′(y)ələnt]
Etymology: L, containing pus
producing or containing pus.

purulent

1. Containing or consisting of pus, exudate.
2. Suppurative, pusy.

pu·ru·lent

(pyūr'ŭ-lĕnt)
Containing, consisting of, or forming pus.

purulent

Pertaining to PUS.

Purulent

Consisting of or containing pus

purulent

characterized by pus formation

purulent

containing or forming pus.

poultry purulent synovitis
swellings on the feet and in the limb joints causing lameness and spondylitis in fowls and turkeys. Caused by Staphylococcus aureus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diagnostic efficacy of MRI in combination with cerebrospinal fluid analysis in diagnosing CNSI: The sensitivity of MRI in combination with cerebrospinal fluid analysis in diagnosing tubercular meningitis, viral meningitis and cryptococcal meningitis was higher than that in diagnosing purulent meningitis.
Regarding the nature of discharge 23% presented with mucoid discharge, 63% with purulent discharge and 14% with mucopurulent discharge.
General endotracheal anesthesia with nasal intubation, incisions, and contraincisions of the neck skin were performed, reaching the pus reservoirs, which were drained, enabling purulent exudates to flow freely.
appendiceal mass, gangrenous appendix or perforated appendix, without the presence of generalised purulent peritonitis.
All other signs showed a marked reduction except purulent discharge which showed little change.
Main outcome measures, evaluated at 48 hours, and at 7 days after the initiation of treatment, included decreasing area of redness/cellulitis or decrease in purulent discharge, or complete resolution of clinical signs of sepsis; no improvement at 48 hours, or development of clinical signs of sepsis (lethargy, poor feeding, fever, hypothermia etc) or increase in redness/cellulitis/discharge, or death.
Sanation began with lancing of intraosteal abscesses with mechanical cleansing of the internal walls of the bone cavities from the areas of osteonecrosis and purulent detritus (Figure 5).
Antibiotics seemed to work better for the subgroup with purulent nasal discharge, but again the risk of side-effects outweighed the benefits of treatment (11 more patients recovering faster versus 12 more with side-effects for every 100 patients given antibiotics).
The purulent byproducts of pulpal infection will seek the path of the least resistance when exiting from the root apex area traveling through bone and soft tissue3 once the cortical bone is penetrated, the sinus tract exit point is determined by the location of muscle attachment and facial sheath, either a cutaneous sinus or an intraoral sinus forms4,5.
Other common clinical manifestations included dermatitis, fever, chills, and a purulent cervical discharge.
For most patients with purulent nasal discharge, antibiotics don't decrease symptom duration; they do increase adverse events (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, 3 meta-analyses and 2 randomized controlled trials [RCTs]).