pursed lips breathing

pursed lips breath·ing

a technique in which air is inhaled slowly through the nose and mouth and exhaled slowly through pursed lips; used by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to improve their breathing by increasing resistance to air flow, thus forcibly dilating small bronchi.

pur·sed lips breath·ing

(pŭrst lips brēdhing)
Technique in which air is inhaled slowly through nose and mouth and exhaled slowly through pursed lips; used by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to improve their breathing by increasing resistance to air flow, thus forcibly dilating small bronchi.
References in periodicals archive ?
The major content included avoiding the pathogenic risk factors of COPD such as smoking and away from dust, smoke and harmful gas, helping the patients understanding the basic knowledge of COPD and common respiratory system drugs, understanding general and special therapies of COPD, learning skills to control disease condition such as abdominal respiration, pulmonary rehabilitation with pursed lips breathing and correct cough and expectoration, understanding monitoring of disease condition and correct time to go to hospital for visiting, and understanding respiratory rehabilitation exercise routines and rehabilitation assessment techniques.
The patients did respiration gymnastics, pursed lips breathing and abdominal respiration under the guidance of specialized rehabilitation therapists, 15 minutes each time, three times each week.
(2008) Influence of spontaneous pursed lips breathing on walking endurance and oxygen saturation in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Pursed lips breathing, essentially a low level positive expiratory pressure of 5 cm[H.sub.2]O suggested by van der Schans et al (1995), is often adopted spontaneously by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to prolong expiration and lower respiratory rate.
Ventilation and arterial blood gas changes induced by pursed lips breathing. Journal of Applied Physiology, 28(6), 784-789.