purines


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purines

A group of nitrogen-containing compounds that includes adenine and guanine, the bases whose sequence forms the genetic code. An excess of purines can cause GOUT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nutritionists have long known that some green vegetables, particularly leafy vegetables, such as spinach, are high in purines, and have consequently recommended that patients with gout reduce their consumption of these vegetables.
Microbial nitrogen (g/d) = =70X / (0.83 x 0.116 x 1,000) =0.727 X where 0.83: digestibility coefficient for microbial purines, 70: nitrogen content of purines (mg/mmol), 0.116: proportion of nitrogen in purines relative to total nitrogen in microbial mass.
High purine diet (red meat, poultry, offal, seafood, pulses, soya, yeast).
Green peas, asparagus, cauliflower, beans, and spinach are high in purines. Carrots and other vegetables, as well as fruit juices, are low in purines.
A relatively simple method of preparing substituted purines was developed and used to synthesize eight different 6-thiopurine analogs.
Purines are key building blocks for the synthesis of DNA and RNA and are involved in a variety of other cellular processes.
Carbonaceous meteorites contain over 70 amino acids, some heterocyclic compounds, including purines, and carboxylic acids.
Uric acid is a substance that results from the breakdown of purines or waste products in the body.
They started with a palindromic sequence of 24 nucleotides: The order of purines and pyrimidines reads the same from either end of the strand.