purging behavior

purging behavior

Psychiatry Emesis induced by ipecac, or use of laxatives, enemas, diuretics, anorexic drugs, caffeine, other stimulants DiffDx IBD, DM, CA, thyroid disease. See Anorexia nervosa, Bulimia nervosa, Eating disorder.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bulimia is an eating disorder characterized by periods of binging followed by purging behavior, such as self-induced vomiting and excessive exercise, as per the American Addiction Centers.
They had bulimia behavior (92%) and purging behavior, including self-induced vomiting (74%) and laxative use (29%).
(2) Patients with the restricting type will severely limit food intake and often over-exercise, whereas patients with binge-purge type will engage in purging behavior after eating in addition to food restricting.
(BED) in NIDDM patients.10 Binge eating disorder is characterized by a pattern of recurrent eating binges without purging behavior.
Another way of analyzing the purging behavior is to look at the amount of resident polymer at the discharge.
This pattern of ingesting huge quantities of attention and then vomiting up anything that is fed resembles bulimia so closely that I will often ask directly about purging behavior when I see the help-rejecting complainer in action.
Thus, as a client's weight decreases or his or her purging behavior increases, the UCC has a structure to support staff in thinking through options and the attendant risks.
Amenorrhea: lack of 3 consecutive menstrual cycles Specific Types: Restricting Type: the person is not regularly engaging in binge-eating or purging behavior Binge-Eating/Purging Type: regularly engaging in binge-eating or purging behavior Bulimia (DSM-IV 307.51) A.
The DSM-IV criteria for eating disorder classify insulin omission as a purging behavior. The diabetic girls with eating disorders were less likely than controls to report dieting to lose weight, even though they reported more binge eating.
The primary goal of treatment for bulimia is to reduce or eliminate binge eating and purging behavior. To this end, nutritional rehabilitation, psychosocial intervention, and medication management strategies are often employed.
While few children meet the criteria for full-blown Anorexia or Bulimia - eating disorders characterized by intense fear of fat and either severe weight loss or binging and purging behavior - a surprising number engage in habits which may lead to life-threatening consequences.