PUN

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PUN

Abbreviation for:
plasma urea nitrogen
patient unmet needs
References in periodicals archive ?
It is punningly and bilingually titled 'Ty-Tea, Guard-Gardd' and is a kind of self portrait.
Diaz's omnivorous linguistic appetite, what we might also punningly
Finally, when Cokes appears eagerly anticipating the puppet show--if the audience has missed these asinine nods to Midas--Jonson has him punningly exclaim, "mine ears long to be at it" (5.4.103).
To be sure, Raphael does contribute to the couple's fall; his role in priming the pair for their demise seems so thorough that he functions, as Milton's appellation for him may punningly suggest, as the "half able" angel.
Michael Blakemore ruffled feathers with his snarky backwards glance at the early days of the National Theatre in the punningly titled Stage Blood, and Kenneth Branagh (a director, of course, as well as an actor) was not yet 30 when his autobiography Beginning was published in 1989.
This month alone, the 2015 NYC Hot Sauce Expo (just one of many such themed events for spicy food lovers) is scheduled to blast off at the Brooklyn Expo Center, with a full slate of demos, eating contests and ceremonies planned, and New York's resident hipster borough will become home to a Kickstarter-funded hot sauce emporium -- punningly dubbed the Heatonist and already active as a mail-order business -- in the city's oh-so-trendy Williamsburg section.
In her review of The Enchanted Princess, theatre critic Audrey Johnson punningly lamented that the children were "not at all enchanted." Barber blames a tired repertoire and a repetitive approach (96-97).
A temporary restaurant, punningly titled ''All Men Must Dine,'' opened in London Friday to mark the DVD release of season four of the HBO series.
"Stinking pump" punningly deploys the dirty dancing shoe in a pneumatic metaphor comparing bawdy desires to filthy water or sewage.
By the end of the poem we see that tiger nature made punningly manifest in the predatory act.
In effect, the relations among patrilinear clans are based in homosocial desire (what Irigaray punningly calls 'hommo-sexuality'), a repressed and, hence, disparaged sexuality, a relationship between men which is, finally, about the bonds of men, but which takes place through the heterosexual exchange and distribution of women" (40-41).
According to Butler, representative men's relations revolve around the notions of friendship, rivalry, and succession; they are "based in homosocial desire (what Irigaray punningly calls "hommo-sexuality"), a repressed and, hence, disparaged sexuality, a relationship between men which is, finally, about the bonds between men, but which takes place through the heterosexual exchange and distribution of women [and through other symbolic expressions]" (1990, 40-41; emphasis in original).