PUN

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PUN

Abbreviation for:
plasma urea nitrogen
patient unmet needs
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet another basic premise of the study is that it is lengthier pun-based interactions rather than isolated instances of verbal humour that, due to providing a solid contextualisation, are better suited for illuminating the inner workings of intricate context-sensitive punning processes and for identifying recurring patterns in playful experimenting with language.
PUNNING BY LADIES-IN-WAITING: PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION OF THE FINDINGS
(7) Admittedly, these quantities look relatively modest when compared to the overall punning output of such stock figures as clowns (e.g., Lance's in TGV, amounting to 70 puns), pages (e.g., Speed's in TGV, consisting of 63 instances of verbal play) or jesters (e.g., Feste's in TN, made up of 65 examples).
Distribution of punning and non-punning discourse of ladies-in-waiting and selected other stock figures LADIES-IN-WAITING CLOWN PAGE JESTER Lucetta Margaret Maria Lance Speed Feste WORDS 548 1226 1852 1474 2470 PUNS 47 40 43 70 63 65 PUN-TO-WORD 8.4% 7.3% 3.5% 3.8% 4.3% 2.6% RATIO Interestingly enough, the ladies-in-waiting do not seem to be fixated on maximising their opportunities for playing with words and, accordingly, they produce extended stretches of discourse, where not a single instance of punning is traceable.
A close investigation of the entire punning discourse of these female figures makes it possible to conclude that the only category of punning partners they share are ladies (their own, in the case of Lucetta and Maria), which renders this configuration of interlocutors particularly intriguing.
Referring back to the most prevalent participant composition, it may come as a surprise that waiting women get involved in punning games with (their) ladies, given the appreciable social distance between the two categories of females.
Secondly and more importantly, the process of selecting data from Shakespeare's texts is beset with difficulties arising from appreciable temporal distance, separating his plays from their modern recipients, which affects language materially, blurring the true picture of the playwright's punning practices.
(18) Furthermore, the reader needs to reckon with the practice of deliberate phonetic manipulation intended for punning purposes, where regular pronunciations of the day are abandoned in favour of substandard varieties of dialectal or vulgar provenance (Delabastita 1993: 85; Kokeritz 1953: 65-66), which markedly obscures the overall picture of Shakespeare's homophony.
13)) and (ii) often admit insufficient semantic distance between them, upsetting the final punning effect.
To make things worse, in both Kokeritz (1953) and Ellis (1973) the term "homonymic" puns is synonymous not only with the present understanding of "homophonic" but also "nonpolysemic (homonymic)" punning.
The multiplicity of punning forms there is largely the consequence of the specificity of the English language which was undergoing sweeping changes in the Elizabethan era, principally lexical (such as the importation of Romance loan-words).
Accordingly, the preponderance of homonymous puns, as evinced in the study, seems to run counter to a prevailing opinion on punning in the play as a carefree and naive experimentation with words which lacks refinement, commonly ascribed to Shakespeare's riper writing.