pulp stones

pulp stones

(pŭlp stōnz)
Calcifications found in the pulp chamber or pulp canals of teeth.
See also: pulp calcification, endolith
References in periodicals archive ?
Dental pulp inflammation also causes deposits of impaired secondary dentin and the formation of denticles or deposits of mineral salts, either loose or connected to hard tissue, called denticles or pulp stones [1,2,3].
In terms of the ratio of pulp stones to the dentin wall, the following types of denticles are distinguished:
The main cause of formation of the pulp stones is difficult to determine.
One of the factors contributing to the formation of calcium deposits that build up pulp stones is the necrosis of pulp cells induced by external stimuli, usually mechanical ones.
Other causes of pulp stones include the dispersed mineralization in the pulp tissue.
A radiographic correlation between systemic disorders and pulp stones.
Pilot study of correlation of pulp stones with cardiovascular disease.
The common obstacles one faces during this crucial part of the treatment are in the form of calcified canals, pulp stones, dentinal obstructions and sclerosed canals.
Type I is recognized roentgenographically as agenesis of the roots, while pulp obliteration in primary teeth, thistle-tube pulp and numerous pulp stones in permanent teeth are characteristic of type II.
Pulp stones may be seen on radiographs of affected teeth.
AI may be associated with some other dental and skeletal developmental defects or abnormalities, such as crown and root resorption, attrition, taurodontism, delayed eruption and tooth impaction, dens in dente, pulp stones, anterior open bite and agenesis of teeth.
According to Seow [7] pulp stones are formed as the result of the external local irritation because of the thin enamel layer and attrition.