pulmonary emphysema


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em·phy·se·ma

(em'fi-sē'mă), Specify pulmonary, mediastinal, and subcutaneous emphysema, and similar usage unless the exact sense is evident from the context.
1. Presence of air in the interstices of the connective tissue of a part.
2. A condition of the lung characterized by increase beyond the normal in the size of air spaces distal to the terminal bronchiole (those parts containing alveoli), with destructive changes in their walls and reduction in their number. Clinical manifestation is breathlessness on exertion, due to the combined effect (in varying degrees) of reduction of alveolar surface for gas exchange and collapse of smaller airways with trapping of alveolar gas in expiration; this causes the chest to be held in the position of inspiration ("barrel chest"), with prolonged expiration and increased residual volume. Symptoms of chronic bronchitis often, but not necessarily, coexist. Two structural varieties are panlobular (panacinar) emphysema and centrilobular (centriacinar) emphysema; paracicatricial, paraseptal, and bullous emphysema are also common. Synonym(s): pulmonary emphysema
[G. inflation of stomach, etc. fr. en, in, + physēma, a blowing, fr. physa, bellows]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

em·phy·se·ma

(em'fi-sē'mă)
1. Presence of air in the interstices of the connective tissue of a part.
2. A condition of the lung characterized by increase beyond the normal in the size of air spaces distal to the terminal bronchiole (those parts containing alveoli), with destructive changes in their walls and reduction in their number. Clinical manifestation is breathlessness on exertion, due to the combined effect (in varying degrees) of reduction of alveolar surface for gas exchange and collapse of smaller airways with trapping of alveolar gas in expiration; this causes the chest to be held in the position of inspiration ("barrel chest"), with prolonged expiration and increased residual volume. Symptoms of chronic bronchitis often, but not necessarily, coexist. Two structural varieties are panlobular (panacinar) emphysema and centrilobular (centriacinar) emphysema; paracicatricial, paraseptal, and bullous emphysema are also common.
Synonym(s): pulmonary emphysema.
[G. inflation of stomach. fr. en, in, + physēma, a blowing, fr. physa, bellows]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about pulmonary emphysema

Q. EMPHYSEMA what type of disease is it?

A. It's a chronic lung disease, characterized by destruction of the walls of the air sacs (alveoli) where the blood exchange oxygen and CO2 with the air. The disease leads to obstruction of the airflow, air trapping inside the lungs, and to many long term complications, and eventually to death. It's caused mainly by smoking.

You may read more here:
www.mayoclinic.com/health/emphysema/DS00296

Q. can you ever get better from emphysema?

A. Emphysema is a chronic state where the lungs pathologically expand and cause them to lose their compliance during breathing. This is not a reversible state, and usually the lung pathological changes will continue to deteriorate if the lungs are exposed to the same pathogens that caused the initial damage (for example- smoking). However, smoking cessation is known to have benefitial results in slowing down the progress of lung disability and somewhat reversing part of the damage by regression of the inflammatory processes that are related to the emphysema.

Q. Does smoking cause emphysema? I know it sounds like a silly question, as you can read everywhere that smoking damages your lung and cause emphysema and lung cancer, but I know a family with 4 brothers,2 of them not smoking and by the age of 50 both of them had emphysema, and another brothers that doesn't stop smoking but is completely healthy. How can than happen?

A. Most of the emphysema patients are smokers, but only a minority of the smokers eventually develop emphysema.

More discussions about pulmonary emphysema
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References in periodicals archive ?
de Maertelaer et al., "Comparison of computed density and microscopic morphometry in pulmonary emphysema," Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol.
Can computed tomography quantify pulmonary emphysema? Eur Respir J 1995;8:843-8.
De Serres, "Efficacy of alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema," Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, vol.
Age, gender, various respiratory diseases, smoking, various environmental factors and occupational exposures are found among the causes of pulmonary emphysema (12).
Oney Kurnaz, "Paratracheal air cysts: prevalence and relevance to pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis using thoracic multidetector CT," Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, vol.
The CT scan showed signs of pulmonary emphysema. The anti-MPO ANCA titre remained negative.
Kozma et al., "Cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema," Stem Cell Reviews, vol.
The persistence of significant desaturation (Sp[O.sub.2] from 97 to 85%) related to the pulmonary emphysema was also observed.
Thurlbeck, "The incidence of pulmonary emphysema, with observations on the relative incidence and spatial distribution of various types of emphysema," The American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol.
Miller et al., "Interleukin-6 promotes pulmonary emphysema associated with apoptosis in mice," American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, vol.
Discussion on the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema: the pathological diagnosis of emphysema.
We found that either low- or high-fat diet affected serum adiponectin levels in smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema rats and BMI was inversely correlated with serum adiponectin levels in rats without smoke exposure.

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