pulmonary collapse

pul·mo·nar·y col·lapse

secondary atelectasis due to bronchial obstruction, pleural effusion or pneumothorax, cardiac hypertrophy, or enlargement of other structures adjacent to the lungs. Often used in the sens of massive collapse.

pul·mo·nar·y col·lapse

(pul'mŏ-nar-ē kŏ-laps')
Secondary atelectasis due to bronchial obstruction, pleural effusion or pneumothorax, cardiac hypertrophy, or enlargement of other structures adjacent to the lungs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before removal, the lung was inspected by two investigators; if there were areas of pulmonary collapse, characterized by color alteration, associated with loss of lung volume, with parenchyma retraction, it was considered as presence of atelectasis and the recruitment maneuver was performed with an additional increase of 5 cm[H.sub.2]O in PEEP and in peak pressure for 5 min.
The reason for failed treatment is that, the consumption of surface active material results in pulmonary collapse and the release of inflammatory mediators, barotrauma and shearing injury caused by mechanical ventilation aggregate lung injury, the release of endogenous NO of those patients is reduced, and moreover pulmonary arteriospasm can induce pulmonary hypertension; therefore, mechanical ventilation alone is lowly effective for some newborns with severe respiratory failure.12,13
Pulmonary collapse or respiratory failure was the ninth leading claim, resulting in $55 million in reimbursements from stop-loss insurance policies.
Pulmonary collapse and consolidation were found in 14 (35%) patients of squamous cell carcinoma in this study.