pull factor

pull factor

A term of art referring to the various factors (e.g., targeted recruiting from wealthy countries, better lifestyle, higher wages) that compel a doctor to leave a developing country in favour of a wealthier one, thereby exacerbating the shortages of trained health personnel in less developed countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
He asked the visiting American official to work with Afghanistan to create a pull factor in the country to encourage refugees to return back to their motherland.
2 kilometre route would serve as a catalyst and a pull factor to the economy of the area.
UAE and Kuwait are very well positioned to take advantage of current conditions-resulting in new issues, provided there is a pull factor from investors.
The UAE and Kuwait are very well positioned to take advantage of current conditions - resulting in new issues, provided there is a pull factor from investors.
The MLR results further show that the social and family pull factors are significant and predictors of career aspirations (social pull factor [beta]=.
As a pull factor, the United Kingdom made affirmative changes to its system which encouraged an influx of Spanish doctors.
Home Secretary Theresa May said net migration was too high but insisted a deal struck by David Cameron will clamp down on abuse of free movement and "reduce the pull factor of our welfare system".
Strong competition in Manhattan and the Prospect Park submarket of Brooklyn will push more buyers to Queens, but there is a pull factor as well.
The impression abroad is that this is a wonderful country to get to, and this is an enormous pull factor.
The pull factor is obvious: ideological and identity proximity and a shared dream of the establishment of an Islamic regime.
But while trying to diminish the pull factor, EU leaders have to be realistic about the powerful push factor, driving people to seek a better life.
It doesn't matter what the pull factor is because the push factor migrants face is greater.