puerperal sepsis


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sepsis

 [sep´sis]
1. the presence in the blood or other tissues of pathogenic microorganisms or their toxins.
puerperal sepsis sepsis after childbirth, due to putrefactive matter absorbed from the birth canal; see also puerperal fever.

pu·er·per·al fe·ver

postpartum sepsis with a rise in fever after the first 24 hours following delivery, but before the eleventh postpartum day.

puerperal sepsis

an infection acquired during the puerperium.

puerperal sepsis

Infection in the female genital tract within 10 days of childbirth, MISCARRIAGE, or ABORTION. There is fever, pain in the lower abdomen and an ill-smelling vaginal discharge. The main site of infection is the raw area on the inside of the womb previously occupied by the PLACENTA but infection may spread to the Fallopian tubes causing SALPINGITIS and sterility or may progress to cause PERITONITIS and SEPTICAEMIA. Treatment is with antibiotics and the surgical removal of any remaining products of conception.

sepsis

the presence in the blood or other tissues of pathogenic microorganisms or their toxins; the condition associated with such presence. See also toxemia, bacteremia.

puerperal sepsis
sepsis occurring after parturition. See also mastitis-metritis-agalactia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite a high burden of puerperal sepsis in South Africa, (2) the incidence of confirmed puerperal sepsis requiring readmission among the study participants was low at only 1.
Patients and Methods All the patients who met with the criteria of puerperal sepsis i.
Of the 58 young women in whom puerperal sepsis developed, 2 died.
Occurrence of postpartum complications like PPH, puerperal sepsis and wound infections was not statistically significant.
The risk of an IUD inserted immediately after childbirth being expelled may be as high as 24%, ACOG noted, and insertion is contraindicated immediately after childbirth for women with peripartum chorioamnionitis, endometritis, or puerperal sepsis.
Furthermore, puerperal sepsis causes an estimated 15% of all maternal deaths, or approximately 75,000 deaths per year worldwide, most of which occur in developing countries (7-9).
Hospitalisations for major puerperal sepsis, genitourinary infections, influenza, bacterial infections, preterm labour and delivery, and liver disorders were more frequent among pregnant HW positive women than their negative counterparts.
This included puerperal sepsis related to viable pregnancies and septic incomplete abortion.
An outbreak of group A hemolytic streptococcal puerperal sepsis was traced to the communal use of bidets (35).
Results; Out of 100 patients of SAMM, 52% had severe obstetrical hemorrhage, 32% had hypertension, 10% had both severe pre-eclampsia and massive obstetrical hemorrhage, 4% had ruptured Ectopic pregnancies, 1% had septic induced abortion and 1(1%) had puerperal sepsis.