pudenda


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Related to pudenda: pudendal nerve

pu·den·da

(pyū-den'dă),
Plural of pudendum.
[L.]

pudenda

Anatomy
1. The external female genitalia.
2. Vulva, see there.

pudenda

The external genitalia. From the Latin pudere , to be ashamed.
References in periodicals archive ?
the "pudenda origo" (Elie Georges Noujain, "History as
It is a black and white photo and Madonna has her breasts exposed and just a white sheet covering her pudenda while she lies on a bed.
George Knapton's notorious portrait of leading founder member Sir Francis Dashwood, 11th Baron Le Despencer, 1742, as a Franciscan friar, chalice in hand, worshipping the pudenda of Venus de'Medici in a mock communion rite (Society of Dilettanti, London) (Redford, op.
Hence, its reference to the pudenda signifies that exposure of the genitals results in evil deeds and causes harm.
The flowers had seemed shameless, like exposed pudenda. Their hypocritical whiteness and their faint scent of corruption set off a deep rage in Mary.
I bought a new bathing suit, just pants and a brassiere: the breasts and the pudenda covered--beneath the sun in frank vulgarity.
La obra relata el caso de Cordula Asangono, una mujer indigena casada con el Jefe tradicional, quien ha sido herida por un pez volador en la zona pudenda mientras hacia sus necesidades en la cubierta de un barco que no tiene aseos, y en el cual viajan el doctor espanol y mAs de doscientos pasajeros.
The dorsal artery of the penis was observed to pass coudally through the body of the penis in a groove formed by the right and left bulbocavernosus muscle after the leaving arteria pudenda interna, and later running along the dorsum penis, each side of the retractor penis muscle.
(4) The combination of an erotic gaze and the buttocks suggests an anal-privileging that is echoed by "pink-gleaming," "baby-smooth," "almost hairless"--phrases that make an implicit (and unfavorable) comparison to pudenda.
to pudenda." Not only is the Greek of Nahum 3:5 intelligible without recourse to the Hebrew (the Hebrew Vorlage influences one to read aiskyne as referring specifically to shame that concerns public nakedness), but it is quaintly archaic to refer to pudenda.