publication bias


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publication bias

(pŭb″lĭ-kā′shŭn) [L. publicare, to confiscate, make public]
The tendency of professional journals to publish and report the results of research trials that show a large positive clinical effect. Studies that demonstrate no association between variables or those that show neutral effects are less likely to be published or reported.

publication bias

The tendency to publish reports of research that appears to support a hypothesis and to refrain from publishing findings that do not, thereby creating opinions about the truth of the hypothesis that may be unduly optimistic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of publication bias was assessed using funnel plots for body weight and fat weight because these outcome measures contained [greater than or equal to] 10 studies.
Publication bias has been defined as "what occurs whenever the research that appears in the published literature is systematically unrepresentative of the population of completed studies" (Rothstein et al.
As a preliminary, we first discuss several of the tools that have been proposed for combatting publication bias and related ills.
Table 3 Assessment of publication bias for the impact of pomegranate consumption on plasma lipids.
Caption: FIGURE 3: Funnel plot in the meta-analysis demonstrating that there was no obvious indication of publication bias.
We used multiple methods to detect publication bias (Beretvas, 2010), including funnel plot analyses, the trim-and-fill procedure suggested by Duval and Tweedie (2000; Richardson, Abraham, & Bond, 2012), and Rosenthal's (1979) failsafe N.
This article examines the issue of whether publication bias is a factor in this emerging research domain.
One aspect of the process that may ultimately influence trust in the literature is an understanding of issues relating to publication bias.
It is increasingly apparent that problems such as publication bias, selective analysis and outcome reporting, and data dredging affect disciplines as remote as clinical medicine, omics, animal studies, economics, social sciences, psychology, and neurosciences.
In addition, there is concern that the TEST Act would actually increase rather than decrease publication bias.
Extensive recent preclinical literature suggests that stem cell-based therapies may offer promise; however the impact of compromised internal validity and publication bias means that efficacy is likely to be somewhat lower than reported here," the authors concluded.

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