puberphonia


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puberphonia

(pū-bĕr-fō'nē-ă),
Continued use of a high-pitched voice by a male after puberty.
[puberty + G. phonē, voice, + ia]

mu·ta·tion·al fal·set·to

(myū-tā'shŭn-ăl fawl-set'ō)
Habitual use of an abnormally high-pitched voice that persists after puberty.
Synonym(s): puberphonia.

puberphonia

(pū″bĕr-fō′nē-ă) [ puber + phono- + -ia]
Persistence of a high-pitched, childlike voice in adolescents or young adults who have already achieved puberty.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Key Words: Puberphonia, Larynx manipulation, Mutational falsetto
Puberphonia is persistence of high pitched childhood voice in puberty among males.
Puberphonia has psychosocial impact on the affected individual which has gross effect on his confidence, maturity and personality.
Recently, laryngoscopy and manipulation has been documented as new technique for addressing puberphonia but very less is present in literature in this regard.
Sample size was calculated from online Raosoft sample size calculator, where prevalence of puberphonia was taken as 1 in 9000003,4.
Moreover, patients who were already under treatment for puberphonia (voice therapy etc), chronic smokers and syndromic/special individuals like Kleinfelter's syndrome and the cases who did not consented for the procedure were also excluded.
The effectiveness of this surgical technique in treating puberphonia was 83.33%.
Puberphonia is of utmost importance and concern for the boys undergoing this phenomenon.
In the present study, we have carried out the surgical technique for puberphonia. In this procedure we performed laryngeal manipulation under general anesthesia.
Pau et al13 have also reported another surgical procedure for correction of mutational falsetto (puberphonia) via mobilizing hyoid and superior halves of thyroid cartilage to reduce cricothyroid distance by apposing hyoid to cricoid cartilage.
Exclusion criteria were children with stammering, puberphonia, acute respiratory distress, deaf mutism, speech articulation and increased or decreased nasal twang in voice.
Chapter Two, "Non-Organic Disorders," begins with an introduction followed by information about muscle tension, disorders, professional voice users, occupational voice disorders, gender dysphoria, puberphonia and psychogenic disorders.