pterygoid plate


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pterygoid plate

Either of a pair of thin, bony processes that arise from the sphenoid bone. They are termed medial and lateral pterygoid plates on each side, serve to bound the infratemporal fossa, and give origin to muscles of mastication.
See also: plate
References in periodicals archive ?
Owing to the freedom of tilting, the implant's thread can be anchored in dense bone structures (Especially in the lingual cortical of the distal mandible, the nasal floor, and the pterygoid plate of the sphenoid bone) and well spread anteriorly-posteriorly, giving an effective supporting polygon [16] marked by four strategic positions, and with additional intermediate (Supporting) implants.
The mandibular nerve leaves the middle cranial fossa through the foramen ovale and descends posterior to the lateral pterygoid plate (Figure 7) between the lateral and the medial pterygoid muscles.
Confirming the elongated pterygoid hamulus radiographically, a reasonable anatomic postulation could have been existed: (1) soft palate mucosa may have been thin and friable than usual; (2) soft palate mucosa may have been much closer than usual to a rather normally located hamulus making it vulnerable to any frictional trauma [21]; and (3) asymmetry of the Pterygoid plates [22].
The mean distances between the JF and the medial and lateral pterygoid plates and the vomer were greater on the right side than the left side.
Jones [2] states that lateral pterygoid plate is broader and shorter than the medial and is directed backwards and slightly laterally.
Thurmond (1974) referred to a fragmentary concave phyllodont plate from the Garvin Church local fauna in the lower Paluxy Formation of Wise County, Texas, as a pterygoid plate from Casierius heckelii.
The lateral pterygoid plate forms the medial margin while the maxilla forms the medial aspect of this space.18 In the present study, 4 impacted maxillary molars were pushed into infratemporal space during exodontias.
Computed tomography (CT) without contrast demonstrated a well-defined 2.1 x 1.8-cm expansile mass arising from the posterolateral wall of the left maxillary sinus, anterolateral to the base of the pterygoid plate (figure, A).
The spinopterygoidal line extends through the medial margin of foramen ovale to the posterior margin of the medial pterygoid plate (Figure 3).
The tensor veli palatini muscle from a relatively broad origin converges on a medial tendon, which passes around the hamulus of the medial pterygoid plate.8 At this point, the tendon is covered with a synovial sheet.9 The tendon is sufficiently broad to occupy most of the length of the hamulus,which is covered by its bursae.8,10 There is evidence that prima- ry function of tensor veli palatini muscle is to open the eustachian tube and not to induce tension on the soft palate.11 However, the tendon of these muscles forms the main element in the aponeurotic anterior portion of the soft palate.
These long implants can utilize the benefit of anchoring in the pterygoid plate in addition to penetrating the two corticals of the maxillary bone.
Coronal scans were superior to axial in orbital floor, orbital roof pterygoid plate, cribriform plate superior and inferior orbital rim fractures.