pterygium


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pterygium

 [tĕ-rij´e-um]
a winglike structure, especially an abnormal triangular fold of membrane in the interpalpebral fissure, extending from the conjunctiva to the cornea.
Pterygium. From Stein et al., 2000.
pterygium col´li webbed neck.

pte·ryg·i·um

(tĕ-rij'ē-ŭm),
1. A triangular patch of hypertrophied bulbar subconjunctival tissue, extending from the medial angle or canthus of the eye to the border of the cornea or beyond, with apex pointing toward the pupil. Synonym(s): web eye
2. Forward growth of the cuticle over the nail plate, seen most commonly in lichen planus. Synonym(s): pterygium unguis
3. An abnormal skin web.
[G. pterygion, anything like a wing, a disease of the eye, dim. of pteryx, wing]

pterygium

(tə-rĭj′ē-əm)
n. pl. pteryg·iums or pteryg·ia (-ē-ə)
An abnormal mass of tissue arising from the conjunctiva of the inner corner of the eye that obstructs vision by growing over the cornea.

pte·ryg′i·al (-əl) adj.

pterygium

Ophthalmology A condition of older adults, characterized by a fleshy triangular fold of tissue that grows from the conjunctiva, encroaching on the cornea; it is clinically insignificant unless it affects the vision; it is usually on the nasal side, and may be bilateral Risk factors Exposure to sun and UV light, dust, sand, wind

pte·ryg·i·um

(tĕr-ij'ē-ŭm)
1. A triangular patch of hypertrophied bulbar subconjunctival tissue, extending from the medial canthus to the border of the cornea or beyond, with its apex pointing toward the pupil.
2. Forward growth of the cuticle over the nail plate, seen most commonly in lichen planus.
3. An abnormal skin web.
[G. pterygion, anything like a wing, a disease of the eye, dim. of pteryx, wing]

pterygium

A wing-shaped thickening of the CONJUNCTIVA that extends over the visible area of the white of the eye and across on to the CORNEA. Pterygium is common in tropical areas and is due to ultraviolet light damage from exposure to sunlight or to local corneal drying. Pterygium usually recurs following surgical removal. Also known as web-eye or duffir (Arabic).

pterygium 

A triangular fold of bulbar conjunctiva, in the interpalpebral fissure, with its apex advancing progressively towards the cornea, usually from the nasal side. A pinguecula often precedes its development. It is considered to be due to a degenerative process caused by recurrent dryness or irritation from wind and dust or prolonged exposure to sunlight, especially UV. It becomes more prevalent with age. Symptoms are usually absent unless the pterygium encroaches on the cornea and vision may then be affected: surgical intervention is then necessary. Some pterygia tend to recur after excision. UV absorptive lenses may help decrease the incidence (Fig. P21). See dellen; dyskeratosis; Stocker's line; pseudopterygium.
Fig. P21 Advanced case of pterygiumenlarge picture
Fig. P21 Advanced case of pterygium

pte·ryg·i·um

(tĕr-ij'ē-ŭm)
1. Triangular patch of hypertrophied bulbar subconjunctival tissue, extending from medial angle or canthus of eye to border of cornea or beyond, with apex pointing toward pupil.
2. Forward growth of the cuticle over the nail plate, seen most commonly in lichen planus.
[G. pterygion, anything like a wing, a disease of the eye, dim. of pteryx, wing]
References in periodicals archive ?
The previous study suggested that this autograft can be used in the surgical treatment of pterygium. In our literature review, we could not find any study performed with T-PRF autograft in the treatment of pterygium surgery.
A retrospective medical record review was conducted on patients who underwent pterygium surgery combined with Ologen or conjunctival autograft at Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University between January 2006 and December 2015.
In the literature, we found no case reports of longitudinal melanonychia, splinter hemorrhages, punctate leukonychia, and pterygium inversum unguis appearing concurrently with onychophagia.
This is the site where pterygium, a noncancerous often bilateral vascularized growth of the cornea, occurs.
Out of the 18(36%) cases of pterygium, there was recurrence in 5(27.7%) cases.
Pterygium unguis formation in porokeratosis of Mibelli.
However, there were systemic conditions such as diabetes mellitus or local diseases such as pterygium, pingeucula or meibomian gland dysfunction in seronegative patient with dry eye.
The patient described in case 1 presented with hemifacial microsomia, microtia, atresic external auditory canal, agenesia of ossicles, crossed renal ectopia, bicuspid aorta, bilateral popliteal pterygium, agenesis of vertebra below D12 level, and corpus callosum hypoplasia.
Pterygium in 1 animal was removed surgically after ligation without reoccurrence for a period
Pterygium is a common fibrovascular proliferative disease affecting the ocular surface and may cause problems such as irritation and vision problems.
His specialist found he had a large growth called a pterygium on his eye.