psychotechnics


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psy·cho·tech·nics

(sī'kō-tek'niks),
An older term denoting the practical application of psychological methods in the study of economics, sociology, and other subjects.
[psycho- + G. technē, art, skill]

psychotechnics

(sī′kō-tĕk′nĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The practical or technological application of psychology, as in analysis of social or economic problems.

psy′cho·tech′ni·cal adj.
psy′cho·tech·ni′cian (-tĕk-nĭsh′ən) n.

psychotechnics

(sī″kō-tĕk′nĭks) [″ + techne, art]
The use of psychological methods in the study of economic and social problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Undergoing pressure in the 30s, he interrupted his works on Paidology and Psychotechnics. For 28 years, Smirnov was Director of the Institute of Psychology of the Russian Academy of Pedagogical Sciences and for more than two decades, chief editor of the most important Russian Psychology journal (Voprosy Psikhologii).
Thus, following the American models of Taylorism and Fordism, Fritz Giese worked with other labor scientists to develop the theory of "psychotechnics." The aim of this theory was to found a science of labor management based on the possibility of coordinating the human body and the machine, both psychologically and physiologically, with the result that the human body would turn into an automaton (Giese, Methoden 468-526).(12) With this body understood to be gendered female, psychotechnics envisioned the working woman as "rationalized" as well as desexualized.