psychosomatic disorder


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psychosomatic

 [si″ko-so-mat´ik]
pertaining to the interrelations of mind and body; having bodily symptoms of psychic, emotional, or mental origin.
psychosomatic disorder (psychosomatic illness) a disorder in which the physical symptoms are caused or exacerbated by psychological factors, such as migraine headache, lower back pain, or irritable bowel syndrome; see also somatoform disorders. It is now recognized that emotional factors play a role in the development of nearly all organic illnesses and that the physical symptoms experienced by the patient are related to many interdependent factors, including psychological and cultural. The physical manifestations of an illness, unless caused by mechanical trauma, cannot be divorced from a person's emotional life. Each person responds in a unique way to stress; emotions affect one's sensitivity to trauma and to irritating elements in the environment, susceptibility to infection, and ability to recover from the effects of illness. Physical conditions to which psychological factors are shown to be contributory are currently classified as psychological factors affecting medical condition. Any physical condition can be so classified, but the most frequently included are asthma, peptic ulcer, bowel disorders, cardiovascular disorders, arthritis, allergy, headache, and certain endocrine disorders. In recent years there has been some success in using behavior therapy to treat these and other illnesses whose symptoms are related to the autonomic nervous system. Clients are taught new ways of coping with stress and new patterns of behavior. Among the techniques used are biofeedback, relaxation training, classical conditioning, and operant conditioning using social and material reinforcement.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic dis·or·der

, psychophysiologic disorder
a disorder characterized by physical symptoms of psychic origin, usually involving a single organ system innervated by the autonomic nervous system; physiologic and organic changes stem from a sustained disturbance.

psychosomatic disorder

A clinical complex, as delineated by the DSM-IV, in which:  
(1) An individual has a biological predisposition to a particular condition, which may have genetic, trauma-related or other predisposing factors; 
(2) The individual has a vulnerable personality—i.e., there is a type or degree of stress that the individual’s coping mechanism and ego structure cannot manage; and
(3) The individual must experience a significant psychosocial stress in his or her susceptible personality area.

psychosomatic disorder

Psychiatry A condition in which
1. A person has a biologic predisposition to a particular condition–genetic, trauma-related, etc;.
2. The person has a vulnerable personality–ie, there is a type or degree of stress that the coping mechanism and ego structure cannot manage;.
3. The person must experience a significant psychosocial stress in a susceptible personality area. See Factitious disorders, Psychogenic 'syndromes. '.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic dis·or·der

, psychophysiologic disorder (sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik dis-ōr'dĕr, sī'kō-fiz'ē-ŏ-loj'ik)
A disorder characterized by physical symptoms of psychic origin, usually involving a single organ system innervated by the autonomic nervous system; physiologic and organic changes stem from a sustained disturbance.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's too bad that O'Sullivan did not consult with any of the psychoanalysts who have studied and treated psychosomatic disorders over the past century, often with some success, but never with sudden success.
Dr Elias is a big believer in the effect of the mind on the body, and psychosomatic disorders. He claims to have instantly cured his receptionist from her 40-a-day smoking habit by hypnosis, and cured a friend's impotence by prescribing him tablets - little did the sufferer know they were aspirin, but the confidence which the medication gave him did the trick.
Psychosomatic Disorders in Seventeenth-Century French Literature.
The Use of Hypnosis in Anxiety, Phobia and Psychosomatic Disorders: An Eight-Year Review (Part One).
For all psychosomatic disorders and every physical conditions influenced by psychological factors, relaxation training seems to be a good complementary therapy.
Noetic dimension of psychosomatic disorders: noopsychosomatics
Adults are suffering from panic disorders, depression and psychosomatic disorders as they struggle to cope with the deeply inhuman situation.
The OPD is based on five axes: experience of illness and prerequisites for treatment, interpersonal relations, conflict, personality structure, and mental and psychosomatic disorders. The second edition of this practical text features a set of tools and procedures for treatment planning and for measuring change with treatment.
Mr Aehmed's counsel, Graham Brodie, said his client was suffering at the time of the applications from psychosomatic disorders.
Emotional effects include loneliness, insecurity, humiliation, fear of school, insomnia, and mood swings, as well as depression, agoraphobia, fear of strangers, anxiety attacks, psychosomatic disorders, eating disorders, and suicide.
Further chapters cover use of hypnosis for smoking control, eating disorders, anxiety, concentration, insomnia, phobias, psychosomatic disorders and much more.