psychosomatic


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Related to psychosomatic: psychosomatic medicine, psychosomatic pain

psychosomatic

 [si″ko-so-mat´ik]
pertaining to the interrelations of mind and body; having bodily symptoms of psychic, emotional, or mental origin.
psychosomatic disorder (psychosomatic illness) a disorder in which the physical symptoms are caused or exacerbated by psychological factors, such as migraine headache, lower back pain, or irritable bowel syndrome; see also somatoform disorders. It is now recognized that emotional factors play a role in the development of nearly all organic illnesses and that the physical symptoms experienced by the patient are related to many interdependent factors, including psychological and cultural. The physical manifestations of an illness, unless caused by mechanical trauma, cannot be divorced from a person's emotional life. Each person responds in a unique way to stress; emotions affect one's sensitivity to trauma and to irritating elements in the environment, susceptibility to infection, and ability to recover from the effects of illness. Physical conditions to which psychological factors are shown to be contributory are currently classified as psychological factors affecting medical condition. Any physical condition can be so classified, but the most frequently included are asthma, peptic ulcer, bowel disorders, cardiovascular disorders, arthritis, allergy, headache, and certain endocrine disorders. In recent years there has been some success in using behavior therapy to treat these and other illnesses whose symptoms are related to the autonomic nervous system. Clients are taught new ways of coping with stress and new patterns of behavior. Among the techniques used are biofeedback, relaxation training, classical conditioning, and operant conditioning using social and material reinforcement.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic

(sī'kō-sō-mat'ik),
Refers to the influence of the mind or psychological functioning of the brain on the physiologic functions of the body relative to bodily disorders or disease and the reciprocal impact of disease on psychological functioning. It can be used pejoratively, especially if it is thought that the possibility of secondary gain exists. See: psychophysiologic, psychogenic.
See also: placebo, nocebo.
[psycho- + G. sōma, body]

psychosomatic

(sī′kō-sō-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a disorder having physical symptoms but originating from mental or emotional causes.
2. Relating to or concerned with the influence of the mind on the body, and the body on the mind, especially with respect to disease: psychosomatic medicine.

psy′cho·so·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

psychosomatic

adjective Referring to symptoms that appear physical but are in fact caused by psychological stress.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic

(sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik)
Pertaining to the influence of the mind or higher functions of the brain (emotions, fears, desires) on the functions of the body, especially in relation to bodily disorders or disease.
See also: psychophysiologic
Synonym(s): psychophysical (2) .
[psycho- + G. sōma, body]

psychosomatic

1. Pertaining to the relationship between the mind and the body.
2. Pertaining to the apparent effect of mental and emotional factors in contributing to physical disorders. These definitions imply the possibly untenable assumptions enshrined in the long-held view (Cartesian dualism) that the mind and the body are distinct, separable entities.

Psychosomatic

Referring to physical symptoms that are caused or significantly influenced by emotional factors. Some doctors regard couvade syndrome as a psychosomatic condition.
Mentioned in: Couvade Syndrome

psy·cho·so·mat·ic

(sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik)
Refers to influence of mind or psychological functioning of brain on physiologic functions of body relative to bodily disorders or disease and reciprocal impact of disease on psychological functioning.
[psycho- + G. sōma, body]
References in periodicals archive ?
The domains of PSE are psychosomatic clinical pictures such as irritable bowel syndrome, where, in many cases, the intestinal flora ignored by mainstream medicine must be treated as well.
Rather than looking deeply into the psyche and the soul where disease originates we have manipulated psychosomatic understandings to fit within a particular framework of understanding - one in which symptoms rather than causes remain the focus.
Psychosomatic medicine aims at developing and perfecting the diagnosis method and the appropriate treatment, adapted to unique needs of the patients.
It's too bad that O'Sullivan did not consult with any of the psychoanalysts who have studied and treated psychosomatic disorders over the past century, often with some success, but never with sudden success.
distress, psychosomatic and self-restraint variables are given in table.1
In short, there was a significant positive relationship between bullying and psychosomatic problems among school children and all forms of bullying were predictors of poor physical and psychological health.
Pozzoli found that bullied children had a significantly greater likelihood of experiencing psychosomatic problems, with an odds ratio of 2.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.76-3.24; P less than .0001).
The APM is the main scientific organisation related to psychosomatic medicine.
This clinical manual presents information on several areas of psychosomatic medicine to assist in assessing the weight of potential psychiatric issues in diagnosing primary complaints.
ERIC Descriptors: Adjustment (to Environment); Smoking; Adolescents; Age; Psychology; Health Conditions; Psychosomatic Disorders; Psychological Patterns; Stress Variables; Symptoms (Individual Disorders); College Students; Foreign Countries; Comparative Analysis; Questionnaires; Social Isolation; Academic Failure; Factor Analysis
Many voices question the fact whether psychoneuroimmunology is a new way of labeling the old, out-of-fashion psychosomatic medicine.
Doctors have known about a group of conditions which go by the name of psychosomatic disorders for more than a century.

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