psychosexual development


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to psychosexual development: Psychosocial development

development

 [de-vel´up-ment]
1. growth and differentiation.
cognitive development the development of intelligence, conscious thought, and problem-solving ability that begins in infancy.
community health development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating members of a community to identify the community's health concerns, mobilize resources, and implement solutions.
critical path development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as constructing and using a timed sequence of patient care activities to enhance desired patient outcomes in a cost-efficient manner. See also critical path.
program development in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as planning, implementing, and evaluating a coordinated set of activities designed to enhance wellness or to prevent, reduce, or eliminate one or more health problems of a group or community.
psychosexual development
1. generally, the development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to maturity.
2. In psychoanalytic theory, the development of object relations has five stages: the oral stage from birth to 2 years, the anal stage from 2 to 4 years, the phallic stage from 4 to 6 years, the latency stage from 6 years until puberty, and the genital stage from puberty onward; see also sexual development.
psychosocial development the development of the personality, including the acquisition of social attitudes and skills, from infancy through maturity.
risk for delayed development a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for delay of 25 per cent or more in one or more of the areas of social or self-regulatory behavior, or in cognitive, language, gross motor, or fine motor skills.
sexual development see sexual development.
staff development
1. an educational program for health care providers conducted by a hospital or other institution; it includes orientation, in-service training, and continuing education.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as developing, maintaining, and monitoring competence of staff.

psy·cho·sex·u·al de·vel·op·ment

maturation and development of the psychic and behavioral phases of sexuality from birth to adult life through the oral, anal, phallic, latency, and genital phases.

psychosexual development

Psychiatry A series of stages from infancy to adulthood, relatively fixed in time, determined by the interaction between a person's biologic drives and the environment; with resolution of this interaction, a balanced, reality-oriented development takes place. See Tanner stage.

psy·cho·sex·u·al de·vel·op·ment

(sī'kō-sek'shū-ăl dĕ-vel'ŏp-mĕnt)
Maturation and development of the psychic and behavioral phases of sexuality from birth to adult life through the oral, anal, phallic, latency, and genital phases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lewes (1998) describes the process of psychosexual development of these homosexual men as follows.
At present we have at our disposal emerging theories of male homosexuality that seek to understand this mode of sexuality as one possible outcome of psychosexual development, devoid of inherent pathology.
This is a helpful theoretical base from which to begin to build a new developmental theory of the psychosexual development of the homosexual male.
Such questions about the role of fatherly affirmation in the psychosexual development of women (and men) go to the heart of many contemporary issues surrounding sexuality, gender, sexual relationships, and sexual satisfaction.
This indicates that their psychosexual development has been adequate and that they have probably experienced favorable individual and family circumstances leading to normal parental identification.
Underlying this rejection, however, one frequently finds immaturity resulting from serious conflicts in psychosexual development.
psychosexual development, denial was considered benign, but when carried
Early in their psychosexual development, children learn about the differences between boys and girls and are taught the proper names for their body parts.
Perito's closing challenge seems to me to be the only way to proceed to advance the process of psychosexual development in the church, namely, that there be a continual dialogue between psychologists and theologians so that our morality will be informed by what is mentally healthy and maturing.
Part One of the book walks us through the entire process of human psychosexual development; offers a working vocabulary of 51 essential definitions and provides extensive information on intimacy and celibacy.
"By supporting their healthy psychosexual development, a sound human formation and growth in grace and virtue will enable seminarians to accept joyfully and live serenely this |precious gift of God.'"
If seminaries, bishops and religious superiors are now to take the matter of healthy psychosexual development and the demands of celibacy more seriously than in the past, as Pope John Paul II is so courageously asking them to do, it is likely that many who would have been accepted into the seminary without such rigorous testing will fail to meet the new standards of admission and that others who would not have been asked to leave the seminary will, in the light of closer scrutiny, be dropped.