psychophysics

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psychophysics

 [si″ko-fiz´iks]
scientific study of the quantitative relations between characteristics or patterns of physical stimuli and the sensations induced by them.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks),
The science of the relation between the physical attributes of a stimulus and the measured, quantitative attributes of the mental perception of that stimulus (for example, the relationship between changes in decibel level and the corresponding changes in the human's perception of the sound).

psychophysics

/psy·cho·phys·ics/ (-fiz´iks) scientific study of quantitative relations between characteristics or patterns of physical stimuli and the sensations induced by them.

psychophysics

(sī′kō-fĭz′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of psychology that deals with the relationships between physical stimuli and sensory response.

psy′cho·phys′i·cal adj.
psy′cho·phys′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·phys′i·cist (-fĭz′ĭ-sĭst) n.

psychophysics

[-fiz′iks]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + physikos, natural
the branch of psychology concerned with the relationships between physical stimuli and sensory responses.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks)
The science of the relation between the physical attributes of a stimulus and the measured, quantitative attributes of the mental perception of that stimulus.

psychophysics

the study of the relationships between the subjectively perceived magnitude of sensations and their actual magnitude, particularly with regard to the ability to detect differences between stimuli of different magnitudes.

psychophysics 

Branch of science that deals with the relationship between the physical stimuli and the sensory response. The measurements of thresholds (e.g. visual acuity, dark adaptation) or matching of stimuli (as in the spectral luminous efficiency curve) are examples of psychophysics. See experimental optometry.

psy·cho·phys·ics

(sī'kō-fiz'iks)
Science of relation between physical attributes of a stimulus and measured quantitative attributes of mental perception of that stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the past 30 years, extensive research has been conducted by psychophysicists, psychologists, neuroscientists, and engineers on various aspects of face recognition by humans and machines (see Bruce [1988] and Ellis et al.
Second, although isoappearance curves are, in fact, trade-off functions, psychophysicists do not think of them that way.
Psychophysicists did not need to reject a null hypothesis to decide if sensory processes were operating, and memory researchers did not have to rely on reaching accepted levels of significance to know if recall or forgetting had occurred.
Perceptual psychophysicists can easily manipulate physical stimuli and can easily study perceptual states (often using a response as a convenient overt measure of the percept).
Van Brakel leaves one with the erroneous impression that the study of the neurophysiology of colour perception is in a state of general disarray, that there is scant physiological backing for functional opponent process schemes proposed by psychophysicists, and that these schemes have thus been rendered highly doubtful.
The reason for this is that the majority of psychophysicists have followed the tradition of E.
Most psychophysicists believe, on the other hand, that it is reasonable to rank order sensations by magnitude.
As the early psychophysicists (including Fechner) noted in their original work with the method of limits, non-sensory factors such as participants' attitudes, motivations, expectations, etc.
Within this theory, anchor-and-adjustment heuristics are seen as typical of the simple algebraic rules that underlie and characterize a wide variety of the behaviours studied by social and developmental psychologists, psycholinguists, psychophysicists and cognitive scientists.

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