psychopharmacology

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psychopharmacology

 [si″ko-fahr″mah-kol´o-je]
1. the study of the action of drugs on psychological functions and mental states.
2. the use of drugs to modify psychological functions and mental states. adj., adj psychopharmacolog´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(sī'kō-far'mă-kol'ŏ-jē),
1. The use of drugs to treat mental and psychological disorders.
2. The science of drug-behavior relationships.
[psycho- + G. pharmakon, drug, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychopharmacology

(sī′kō-fär′mə-kŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of pharmacology that deals with the study of the actions, effects, and development of psychoactive drugs.

psy′cho·phar′ma·co·log′ic (-kə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·phar′ma·co·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·phar′ma·col′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(sī'kō-fahr'mă-kol'ŏ-jē)
1. The use of drugs to treat mental and psychological disorders.
2. The science of drug-behavior relationships.
[psycho- + G. pharmakon, drug, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

psychopharmacology

The study of drugs that affect the state of the mind and the behaviour.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

psy·cho·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(sī'kō-fahr'mă-kol'ŏ-jē)
1. Use of drugs to treat mental and psychological disorders.
2. Science of drug-behavior relationships.
[psycho- + G. pharmakon, drug, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It was found that, at the expense of less toxic alternatives, the most commonly used psychopharmacological drugs during critical and chronical states of mental alterations were: Fluoxetine, Sertraline, Imipramine, Lithium Carbonate, Haloperidol, Clozapine, Risperidone, Olanzapine, Diazepam, Alprazolam, Lorazepam, and Buspirone.
State of the art psychopharmacological treatment options in seasonal affective disorder.
According to Brochu (2006), psychopharmacological crimes most commonly occur when intoxicated on stimulants, amphetamines, sedatives, or alcohol.
The noted drift away from family also reflects a behavioral paradigm focused on individual deficits or psychopathology, DSM-5, and evidence-based individual and psychopharmacological interventions.
(4.) Walter Glannon, "Psychopharmacological Enhancement," Neuroethics, vol.
In contrast manic disturbances are briefer and often respond to treatment within weeks.2 In bipolar patients who get afflicted by severe and prolonged mania there can be adverse physical psychological and social consequences which underscore the need to quickly bring such exacerbations under control.3 Rarely mania becomes resistant to usual psychopharmacological interventions and continues unabated in spite of adequate treatment with anti-manic agents.4 We present here the case of a teenaged girl who had a severe manic exacerbation that persisted for several months with symptoms continuing unabated in spite of optimal drug treatment.
No data was available for two crucial indicators: number of people with mental disorders treated by primary health care, and interventions (psychopharmacological and psychosocial) delivered by primary health care to people with mental disorders.
Both military psychiatric thought and Soviet psychopharmacological fear research were, in wartime, supplemented by shooting panicked, deserting soldiers.
Maximising life's potential in AIDS: A psychopharmacological update.
This edition has been updated to include the UK's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence advice on the tiered approach to managing depression, more on psychological approaches, and an update on psychopharmacological issues, as well as care pathways and changes to how services are organized.
He urges that attention to music's spiritual character replace the prevailing psychopharmacological explanatory models for music therapy.