psychopathology

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psychopathology

 [si″ko-pah-thol´o-je]
1. the branch of medicine dealing with the causes and processes of mental disorders.
2. abnormal, maladaptive behavior or mental activity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

(sī'kō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē),
1. The science concerned with the pathology of the mind and behavior.
2. The science of mental and behavioral disorders, including psychiatry and abnormal psychology.
[psycho- + G. pathos, disease, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychopathology

(sī′kō-pə-thŏl′ə-jē, -pă-)
n.
1. The study of the origin, development, and manifestations of mental or behavioral disorders.
2. The manifestation of a mental or behavioral disorder.

psy′cho·path′o·log′ic (-păth′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·path′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·pa·thol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

(sī'kō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the pathology of the mind and behavior.
[psycho- + G. pathos, disease, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

psychopathology

The study of the nature of abnormal mental processes and their effects on behaviour.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Psychopathology

A mental disorder or illness, such as schizophrenia, personality disorder, or major depressive disorder.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

(sī'kō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
1. Science concerned with pathology of mind and behavior.
2. Science of mental and behavioral disorders.
[psycho- + G. pathos, disease, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The Nigerian norm was used as the basis for classifying the respondents into a normal or psychopathologic index across the subscales.
A range of researches has shown a positive association between psychopathologic symptoms and efforts made to avoid emotions, thoughts, memories and other private events (Hayes et al., 1999; Eifert, & Forsyth, 2005).
453, 454 (2005) (discussing children with physical disabilities and lack of social skills as being bullied by peers); Young Shin Kim et al., School Bullying and Youth Violence: Causes or Consequences of Psychopathologic Behavior?, 63 ARCHIVE GEN.
The fourth area of the individual creativity investigation borders to the psychiatry and deals with psychopathologic or other phenomena that are close to the pathology.
Several studies also indicate potential neurotoxic effects of repeated amphetamine use (McCann & Ricaurte 2004), especially in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), or the inducing of psychopathologic symptoms (McCann & Ricaurte 2004; Ricaurte et al.
The SCL-90-R is a 90-item self-report inventory, developed by Derogatis and Cleary (1977), and Derogatis (1994) for the assessment of psychological problems and psychopathologic symptoms, with the 90 items being rated on a 5-point scale of distress (between 0 = not at all and 4 = extremely).
School bullying and youth violence --causes or consequences of psychopathologic behavior?
(2006) Exercise therapy as a treatment for psychopathologic conditions in obese and morbidly obese adolescents: a randomized, controlled trial.
These can be difficult questions to tease out under any circumstances, but if the dynamics are such that risk exists for MSP, and there is a history of serial problems raised by the mother or father that have led to increased diagnostic testing without arriving at an adequate explanation, consideration of psychopathologic behavior on the part of a parent can be complex indeed.
(5) More specifically, a prospective study showed that a number of factors including psychopathologic behavior, social problems, and externalizing behavior problems were consequences, not causes, of bullying behaviors.