psychoneurosis

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psychoneurosis

 [si″ko-noo͡-ro´sis]
neurosis. adj., adj psychoneurot´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·neu·ro·sis

(sī'kō-nū-rō'sis),
1. A mental or behavioral disorder of mild or moderate severity.
2. Formerly a classification of neurosis that included hysteria, psychasthenia, neurasthenia, and the anxiety and phobic disorders.
[psycho- + G. neuron, nerve, + -osis, condition]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychoneurosis

(sī′kō-no͝o-rō′sĭs, -nyo͝o-)
n. pl. psychoneuro·ses (-sēz)
Neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis.

psy′cho·neu·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj. & n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neu·ro·sis

, pl. neuroses (nūr-ō'sis, -sēz)
1. A psychological or behavioral disorder in which anxiety is the primary characteristic; defense mechanisms or any of the phobias are the adjustive techniques that a person learns to cope with this underlying anxiety. In contrast to the psychoses, people with a neurosis do not exhibit gross distortion of reality or disorganization of personality.
2. A functional nervous disease, or one for which there is no evident lesion.
3. A peculiar state of tension or irritability of the nervous system; any form of nervousness.
Synonym(s): neurotic disorder, psychoneurosis.
[neuro- + G. -osis, condition]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

psychoneurosis

See NEUROSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

psy·cho·neu·ro·sis

(sī'kō-nūr-ō'sis)
Mental or behavioral disorder of mild or moderate severity.
[psycho- + G. neuron, nerve, + -osis, condition]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dabrowski's stated purpose was to investigate the relationship between two sets of characteristics: superior abilities and psychoneuroses. Dabrowski (1972) defined superior abilities as "abilities (in any field), which permit an individual to achieve results considerably surpassing the average accepted as standard for individuals of the same age and the same level of education" (p.
The Jew was prone to functional psychoses and psychoneuroses, especially those "designated as Jewish neurasthenia or Hebraic debility." With such an inferior sympathetic nervous system, the Jew was thus abnormally emotionally sensitive, leading to "palpitation of the heart, flushing, gastrointestinal disturbances, trembling, sweating and fatigue, in other words the typical picture of Jewish neurasthenia dependent on emotional stimulation of the ductless glands, probably the adrenal system" (1918:130).
In using icons representative of both hysteria and obsessive neuroses, Dali presents the range of psychoneuroses Freud outlines in "'Civilized' Sexual Morality." There is no mistaking the fact that the photomontage presents images of hysteria with a series of women's faces, while the images of sadistic compulsive behavior are represented by the series of men's ears.
Suskind, admitted he omitted from his published reports references to psychoneuroses and long-term nervous system and liver damage among exposed workers.
The Ministry of Pensions was determined to avoid paying out pensions for psychoneuroses, as it had in the 1920s.
Freud emphasized this in a 1905 essay in which he stated, "My views concerning the etiology of the psychoneuroses have never yet caused me to disavow or abandon two points of view: namely, the importance of sexuality and of infantilism."
I read about the Oedipus Complex (Freud, 1905) and became confused and disturbed by it, establishing myself as existing in an explicitly sexualized world, as though acknowledging that constant possibility in relating would purge my unconscious of the illness that I now understood could reside therein: 'Psychoneuroses are based on sexual instinctual forces' (Freud, 1905: p 79).