area

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area

 [a´re-ah] (pl. a´reae, areas) (L.)
a limited space or plane surface.
acoustic a's auditory areas.
association a's areas of the cerebral cortex (excluding primary areas) connected with each other and with the neothalamus; they are responsible for higher mental and emotional processes, including memory, learning, speech, and the interpretation of sensations.
Area. Functional areas and lobes of the cerebrum.
auditory a's two contiguous areas of the temporal lobe in the region of the anterior transverse temporal gyrus, known as the primary and secondary auditory areas. Called also acoustic areas.
Broca's motor speech area an area comprising parts of the opercular and triangular portions of the inferior frontal gyrus; injury to this area may result in motor aphasia.
Broca's parolfactory area a small area of cortex on the medial surface of each cerebral hemisphere, between the anterior and posterior parolfactory sulci. Called also area subcallosa.
Brodmann's a's specific occipital and preoccipital areas of the cerebral cortex, distinguished by differences in the arrangement of their six cellular layers, and identified by numbering each area. They are considered to be the seat of specific functions of the brain.
catchment area
1. the geographical region drained by one body of water.
2. the area whose residents are served by a specialized health care agency. Called also catchment.
contact area proximal surface.
embryonic area (germinal area) (area germinati´va) embryonic disk.
Kiesselbach's area an area on the anterior part of the nasal septum, richly supplied with capillaries, and a common site of epistaxis (nosebleed).
language area any nerve center of the cerebral cortex, usually in the dominant hemisphere, controlling the understanding or use of language.
motor area any area of the cerebral cortex primarily involved in stimulating muscle contractions; most are in the precentral gyri. See also premotor area, sensorimotor area, and Broca's motor speech area.
motor speech area see Broca's motor speech area and Wernicke's area.
occupational performance a's categories of activities that make up an individual's occupational performance; they include activities of daily living, work activities, and play or leisure activities. A delay in any of these areas may be addressed by occupational therapy intervention.
olfactory area
1. a general area of the brain, including the olfactory bulb, tract, and trigone, the anterior portion of the gyrus cinguli, and the uncus.
postcentral area (postrolandic area) an area just posterior to the central sulcus of the cerebral hemisphere that is the primary receiving area for general sensations.
precentral area primary somatomotor area.
premotor area an area of the motor cortex of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the precentral gyrus.
primary area areas of the cerebral cortex comprising the motor and sensory regions.
primary receiving a's the areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the thalamic projections of the primary sensory modalities such as vision, hearing, and smell. Called also sensory areas.
primary somatomotor area an area in the posterior part of the frontal lobe just anterior to the central sulcus; different regions control motor activity of specific parts of the body. Called also precentral area and rolandic area.
projection a's those areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the most direct projection of the sensory systems of the body.
sensorimotor area the cortex of the precentral and postcentral gyri, which are the motor area and the primary receiving area for general sensations, respectively.
sensory a's primary receiving areas.
sensory association area an association area around the borders of a primary receiving area, where sensory stimuli are interpreted.
silent area an area of the brain in which pathologic conditions may occur without producing symptoms.
somatic sensory area (somatosensory area) either of two cortical projection areas in or near the postcentral gyrus where conscious perception of somatic sensations occurs, known as the first or primary somatosensory area and the second or secondary somatosensory area.
area subcallo´sa (subcallosal area) Broca's parolfactory area.
area under the curve (AUC) the area enclosed between the curve of a probability with nonnegative values and the axis of the quality being measured; of the total area under a curve, the proportion that falls between two given points on the curve defines a probability density function.
visual a's three areas (first, second, and third visual areas) of the visual cortex. The first visual area is better known as the striate cortex.
vocal area rima glottidis.
Wernicke's area originally a name for a speech center thought to be confined to the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus next to the transverse temporal gyri; the term now refers to a wider zone that also includes the supramarginal and angular gyri.

ar·e·a (a),

, pl.

ar·e·ae

(ār'ē-ă, -ē),
1. Any circumscribed surface or space.
See also: regio, region, space, spatium, zone.
2. All of the part supplied by a given artery or nerve.
See also: regio, region, space, spatium, zone.
3. A part of an organ having a special function, as the motor area of the brain.
See also: regio, region, space, spatium, zone.
[L. a courtyard]

area

A zone or region.

Neuroanatomy
As refers to functional regions of the brain, the complete noun is X area of the cerebral cortex, as in prefrontal area of the cerebral cortex, motor area of the cerebral cortex, and so on; the most common “short” form is either X area or X cortex.

ar·e·a

(ār'ē-ă)
1. Any circumscribed surface or space.
2. All of the part supplied by a given artery or nerve.
3. A part of an organ having a special function, as the motor area of the brain.
See also: regio, region, space, spatium, zone
[L. a courtyard]

area 

1. Any limited surface or space.
2. 
A part of the brain or retina having a particular function.
Brodmann's area's Areas of the cerebral cortex defined by Brodmann and numbered from 1 to 52. Areas 17, 18 and 19 represent the visual area and visual association areas in each cerebral cortex.
area centralis See macula lutea.
area of comfort Zone of comfort. See Percival criterion.
extrastriate visual area See visual association areas.
fusion area See Panum's area.
Panum's area An area in the retina of one eye, any point of which, when stimulated simultaneously with a single point in the retina of the other eye, will give rise to a single percept. Its diameter in the fovea is about 5 minutes of arc and increases towards the periphery (Fig. A17). Syn. fusion area. See retinal disparity; horopter; retinal corresponding points; Panum's fusional space.
rod-free area See foveola.
striate area See visual area.
visual area 1. Any region of the brain in which visual information is processed. 2. This is Brodmann's area 17 in each occipital lobe. It contains six layers of cells numbered 1 to 6 from top, layer 4 being subdivided into three sublayers 4A, 4B and 4C. Layer 4C receives inputs from the photoreceptors in the retina via the lateral geniculate bodies. There are also some afferents to layers 1 and 6. The primary visual area is identified by a white striation (line of Gennari) on each side of the calcarine fissure. This white line appears in the middle of the fourth layer of the visual cortex and is composed of fibres from the optic radiations. Syn. primary visual area; primary visual cortex; striate area; striate cortex; V1; visual cortex. 3. It also refers to all parts of each occipital lobe related to visual functions. Syn. prestriate cortex. See cortical column; occipital cortex; calcarine fissure; lateral geniculate bodies; cortical magnification.
visual association area's They are the parastriate area (Brodmann's area 18) and the peristriate area (Brodmann's area 19) of the occipital cortex surrounding the visual area. Areas 18 and 19 are subdivided into multiple zones (called V2, V3, V4, V5, V6, etc.). They receive projections from the striate cortex. They are also connected to other areas of the cortex and via the corpus callosum with areas 18 and 19 of the opposite hemisphere and receive feedback information. It has been shown that V4 and the inferotemporal cortex or IT (components of the ventral or temporal cortex) receive substantial input from the parvocellular pathway. V5 (also called middle temporal cortex or MT, a component of dorsal or parietal cortex) receives input from the magnocellular pathway. Processing that occurs in the visual association areas helps to interpret the message that reaches the visual area and to recall memories of previous visual experiences (Fig. A18). Syn. extrastriate visual area; extrastriate cortex; prestriate cortex (these terms actually represent all the regions outside the striate cortex where visual processing takes place); secondary visual cortex. See agnosia; magnetic resonance imaging fMRI; prosopagnosia; magnocellular visual system; parvocellular visual system.
Fig. A17 The eyes are fixating X on the horopter H. Stimulation of point N in the left retina and of any point within Panums area P of the right retina gives rise to a perception of singleness and stereopsisenlarge picture
Fig. A17 The eyes are fixating X on the horopter H. Stimulation of point N in the left retina and of any point within Panum's area P of the right retina gives rise to a perception of singleness and stereopsis
Fig. A18 Lateral surface of the human cortex showing some of the primary areas. Association areas occupy very large portions of the cortex beyond the primary areas. From the primary visual area information is passed onto the surrounding association areas terminating in the inferior temporal (IT) lobe specialized for object identification (ventral pathway or what system), and the other in the parietal lobe or more precisely near the junction of the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes (referred to as MT) specialized for object localization (dorsal pathway or where system). Integration of information from these pathways is likely further processed ultimately in the frontal lobeenlarge picture
Fig. A18 Lateral surface of the human cortex showing some of the primary areas. Association areas occupy very large portions of the cortex beyond the primary areas. From the primary visual area information is passed onto the surrounding association areas terminating in the inferior temporal (IT) lobe specialized for object identification (ventral pathway or 'what' system), and the other in the parietal lobe or more precisely near the junction of the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes (referred to as MT) specialized for object localization (dorsal pathway or 'where' system). Integration of information from these pathways is likely further processed ultimately in the frontal lobe

ar·e·a

(ār'ē-ă)
1. [TA] Any circumscribed surface or space.
2. All of the part supplied by a given artery or nerve.
3. A part of an organ having a special function, as the motor area of the brain.
See also: region, space, zone
[L. a courtyard]

Patient discussion about area

Q. I have this blackhead on my cheek area for about a year..,How do I remove it?

A. This type of blackhead you are describing sounds like comedonal (non-inflammatory) acne, as opposed to acne that is inflammatory or severe inflammatory (which usually will not remain for a year on the skin). There are many basic local treatments which can be found at pharmacies over-the-counter. Whether it is gel or cream (which are rubbed into the pores over the affected region), bar soaps or washes - it is important to keep the skin clean of bacteria, that may worsen blackheads.

Q. What does it mean when you have breast cancer in three different areas? My friend just found out that she has breast cancer in her right breast but three different lump types of cancer in one breast, and it has affected her lymph nodes at least two of them. What are her chances and what stage cancer would that be? She is going to be having a mastectomy and chemo.

A. Did they biopsied the lumps? Are they sure they are cancerous? If so that means it might got metastasized, the cancerous cells can move around in the blood stream and then just start “hook” on an organ and continue multiplying. That is a malignant and dangerous situation.

Q. I have terrible pain in my groin area when i try to walk. Any clues?

A. Well, first of all, it depends on your gender, since men and women have different things in their groin...

Is the pain aggravated by coughing or straining? Do you feel any bulge?
In this case, it may be an inguinal hernia, which is quite common in men.

You can read more here (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003111.htm), and consulting a doctor may also be wise.

More discussions about area