psychometry

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psychometry

 [si-kom´et-re]
the testing and measuring of mental and psychological ability, efficiency, potentials, and functioning. adj., adj psychomet´ric.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·chom·e·try

(sī-kom'ĕ-trē),
The discipline pertaining to psychological and mental testing, and to any quantitative analysis of a person's psychological traits or attitudes or mental processes.
Synonym(s): psychometrics
[psycho- + G. metron, measure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychometry

(sī-kŏm′ĭ-trē)
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

psychometry

Fringe medicine  
(1) Psychometric analysis, see there.
(2) Object reading, see there.

Mainstream psychology
(1) Any test used to measure a psychologic variable (e.g., abilities, intelligence, moods, personality). The term “psychometric testing” is increasingly preferred, given the potential for confusing legitimate psychological testing formats with pseudoscientific methods.
(2) The science of testing and measuring mental and psychologic ability, efficiency potentials and functioning—e.g., psychopathologic components.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·chom·e·try

(sī'kom'ĕ-trē)
The discipline pertaining to psychological and mental testing, and to any quantitative analysis of a person's psychological traits or attitudes or mental processes.
Synonym(s): psychometrics.
[psycho- + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

psychometry

The measurement of psychological functions, including correlative ability, memory, aptitudes, concentration and response to logical puzzles. Intelligence has never been adequately defined and so there are no tests for pure intelligence.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This concerns the fact that the leading psychometrists, such as Cattell and Eysenck, figures whom Cattell is keen to separate from mere itemetric moles, regard factors only as starting points for their investigations.
Still, it appears that rancorous debate over the nature of intelligence will continue to focus on the tools of the psychometrists' trade -- IQ and g.
Indeed, it is a general psychometric principle that a test cannot correlate with another separate test any higher than it can correlate with itself - i.e., estimated subscale intercorrelations will always be lower than the true value for the subscale intercorrelation, because of what psychometrists call "attenuation due to unreliability." Given that generally the test-retest reliabilities for Tobacyk and Milford's original subscales fell somewhat short of being satisfactory (only Psi Beliefs and Extraordinary Life Forms were above Kline's [1993] accepted minimum of .80), we should note a particular degree of caution in dismissing evidence for relatedness in the subscales.
Moreover, cultural differences should not be misinterpreted as lack of motivation, but should be noted by psychometrists as observations, which may be attributable to socioculture factors.