psychometry

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psychometry

 [si-kom´et-re]
the testing and measuring of mental and psychological ability, efficiency, potentials, and functioning. adj., adj psychomet´ric.

psy·chom·e·try

(sī-kom'ĕ-trē),
The discipline pertaining to psychological and mental testing, and to any quantitative analysis of a person's psychological traits or attitudes or mental processes.
Synonym(s): psychometrics
[psycho- + G. metron, measure]

psychometry

(sī-kŏm′ĭ-trē)

psychometry

Fringe medicine  
(1) Psychometric analysis, see there.
(2) Object reading, see there.

Mainstream psychology
(1) Any test used to measure a psychologic variable (e.g., abilities, intelligence, moods, personality). The term “psychometric testing” is increasingly preferred, given the potential for confusing legitimate psychological testing formats with pseudoscientific methods.
(2) The science of testing and measuring mental and psychologic ability, efficiency potentials and functioning—e.g., psychopathologic components.

psy·chom·e·try

(sī'kom'ĕ-trē)
The discipline pertaining to psychological and mental testing, and to any quantitative analysis of a person's psychological traits or attitudes or mental processes.
Synonym(s): psychometrics.
[psycho- + G. metron, measure]

psychometry

The measurement of psychological functions, including correlative ability, memory, aptitudes, concentration and response to logical puzzles. Intelligence has never been adequately defined and so there are no tests for pure intelligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like most psychometricians, Catherine works with subject-matter experts to identify what a test taker should know to be competent in a particular discipline.
MARK WILSON, a psychometrician and education researcher, is a professor at University of California, Berkeley's Graduate School of Education and the founding director of the Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research (BEAR) Center.
Psychometricians and compositionists, for example, use the terms, but the disciplines and the authors within these disciplines attach drastically different meanings to the two measurement terms.
Today, as well as the students, the Psychometrics Centre employs a number of occupational psychologists and psychometricians to provide their consultancy and training services.
The psychometricians of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries took a stratified and conservative society and constructed a ladder of opportunity by which bright children could be given the proper place in the social order; as our own society becomes more stratified and conservative--as the scribes of the New York Times et al.
Each individual on the commission has extensive experience in certification either at the technical level (ie, psychometricians) or at the policy level (ie, board or staff members of certification agencies).
To date, some psychometricians have applied cognitive psychology principals to psychometric models of educational assessment data.
Their discussion of the SAT also leaves me with the feeling that somehow we have invested a class of individuals--the "psychometricians"--with the power to dictate our lives in fundamental ways, using a discourse that only certain people can understand and arbitrate, and a legitimacy that forces us to address the problems they create and to question them using only the tools they authorize.
"If we waited for statisticians and psychometricians to get [school evaluation] right [in every state] we'd never get anything done [for disadvantaged kids]," said Miller's education aide at the time.
Typically, cognitive assessment requires a complex battery of tests that can be performed only by experienced psychometricians. What is needed is a brief, simple test that can be administered by personnel not specifically trained in psychometrics, the investigators said (Interact.
Statisticians, operations researchers, psychologists and psychometricians all fed into the process as well--that's a lot of years of investment by a lot of 'human capital' experts.
* Gardner says that most psychometricians, those who devise and interpret tests as a way of probing the nature of intelligence, conceive of intelligence as unitary.